Key Stage 5 Options Booklet

Biddenham International School

Key Stage 5 Curriculum Information

2017 - 2018




Click here if you would like to download a PDF copy of the KS5 Options Booklet 2017-2018
Click here if you would like to download a PDF copy of the KS5 Additional Course Requirements 2017-2018


Sixth Form Information

Here at Biddenham, we have a large and inclusive sixth form in which everyone is encouraged to

fulfill their academic and personal potential. Despite our steady growth, we pride ourselves on

being a friendly place to learn, and students seem to settle in quickly and easily, whether or not

they have been with us in Year 11.

ALL course subjects are subject to availability.


LEVEL 2 COURSES

Entry Requirements

Grade 3 in English Language and Maths and a minimum of 4 other Level 2 qualifications at grade D/3 or above.

Subjects available to study on the Level 2 Course:



GCSE - Art, Craft & Design
GCSE - Additional Science
GCSE - Psychology
BTEC - Work Skills
GCSE - English
GCSE - Mathematics
GCSE - Media

LEVEL 2 COURSE SUBJECT INFORMATION

NB: ALL course subjects are subject to availability.

GCSE Art, Craft & Design ( Fine Art / Art Textiles/ Graphics)


What will I learn?

Learn the broad skills, knowledge and understanding of Art, Craft and Design including drawing for

practical art & design work and a range of media including, painting, printing, applique and

stitch.
This course provides a basic understanding of the creative process in the visual arts and the

relevant skills for progression to Art and Design at level 3: Applied Art & Design L3, A Level Art

& Design, A level Art Textiles, A level Graphic Communication or employment in the Art & design

sector.

The critical elements for an artist or designer are the successful communication of a message

through the organisation of images, symbols and words . Areas covered will be Illustration,

Typography and Printmaking as well as drawing and painting , textiles and mixed media. It

encourages candidates to develop the skills of problem solving, interpreting visual material,

analysis and evaluation. The specification is relevant to everyday life through the study of

relevant moral and ethical areas of Art & Design.


What are the entry requirements?

Grade D at GCSE Art & Design-Unendorsed , Textiles or Graphics is desirable. The main requirement

is that you have an interest in learning how to draw using a variety of media, enjoy developing

ideas and have a desire to learn practical skills. You need to be prepared to master technical

skills and work to deadlines.


How will I be assessed?

There are two components to the course of study as follows:

Unit 1: Personal Portfolio – Coursework 60% of Qualification

Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment – Practical Examination 40% of Qualification.

NB: The paper is given out 8 school weeks prior to the examination.

There are four Assessment Objectives:

  • AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical

    understanding of sources.

  • AO2: Refine work by selecting and experimenting with appropriate media,

    materials, techniques and processes.

  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work

    progresses.
    .

  • AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and

    demonstrates understanding of visual language


What are the costs?

We may visit local or national places of interest such as galleries and exhibitions which may

incur travel costs.


Is there anything else I need to know?

Though there are many skills to learn, your teacher will use a variety of methods to deliver the

subject. There will be teacher input and demonstrations, question and answer sessions, practical

work, individual work, group work, discussions and student presentations. You will be expected to

read a lot to reinforce your knowledge and understanding, apply yourself to solve creative problems

and issues; carry out independent research, contribute to class discussions and activities and be

committed to hard work.


Future opportunities?

Students who successfully complete the course will be able to progress onto Level 3 Applied Art &

design, AS/A2 Art & Design or employment.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course Contact: Mr A Kavanagh, allan.kavanagh@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Ms Venables chrissie.venables@mybiddenham.com
Examination Board: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/art-and-design/gcse/8201

Additional Science


What will I learn?

Additional Science: This covers the new Science Programme of Study. This has been developed so that

students become more ‘scientifically literate', i.e. they are able to make reasoned judgements

about the science issues which may affect them in their everyday lives.

Unit 1: Biology 2

Unit 2: Chemistry 2

Unit 3: Physics 2

Unit 4: ISA – controlled assessment


How will I be assessed?

Three 60 minute (tiered) structured and closed question papers that contain at least one question

assessing Quality of Written Communication in a science context. These papers will be sat in June.

Each paper is worth 25% of the overall GCSE.


CENTRE ASSESSED UNIT (ISA)

Additional Science has a centre assessed aspect that is worth 25% of the GCSE. The ISA assesses the

student's ability to undertake a task and collect, process and evaluate data. Students carry out a

practical task set by AQA, under normal laboratory conditions, they then take a written test under

controlled conditions.


Future opportunities?

The course prepares students for progression onto A level sciences.

The development of science in a modern society is essential for economic growth. It increasingly

plays a part in our everyday lives. The list of career opportunities is almost endless. They range

from the medical profession, i.e. doctor, nurse, pharmacist, public health and dentistry, to

construction engineering, chemical engineering and mechanical engineering. Opportunities also occur

in computing, electronics, telecommunications and electrical engineering. Scientists also form an

important part of the aerospace industry, industrial chemical manufacturing, textiles and car

industry.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr Antony Parish - antony.parish@mybiddenham.com

Exam board information: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science#bm-GCSE

GCSE English / English Language (Retake)


What will I learn?

The specification offers a skills-based approach to the study of English Language. This enables

candidates to make fresh and individual responses to each element of assessment. The specification

is most suitable for those who wish to explore English Language in more depth and experience

greater breadth of English studies at this level.


How will I be assessed?

There is a single exam in the summer term. Students will be assessed over a 2 hour and 15 minute

period. The paper is split into two sections. The first section requires students to answer four

questions based on three reading sources. The second section requires students to complete two

creative writing tasks - one shorter task (worth 16 marks) and one longer task (worth 24 marks).


What are the entry requirements?

All students who did not achieve at least a C-grade at the end of Year 11 will study GCSE English /

English Language. The exam board is AQA.


Future opportunities?

A good command of the spoken and written word is vital for success in other subject areas. English

is a must have subject for college, university, work and life.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Laura Steward, Head of English: Mrs L Steward, laura.steward@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board: http://web.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english.php


GCSE Mathematics (Retake)

Mathematics is concerned with the nature of numbers and space, pattern and relationships, and is a

major tool in helping people make sense of, and describe, the world as well as to solve problems

new and old, real and abstract. We believe that mathematics is a creative and useful activity

requiring not only facts and skills, but also understanding gained through exploration and

application.


What Will I Learn?

We aim to provide relevant mathematical knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable students to have

the necessary independence in adult society as well as promoting the ability and willingness to

contribute actively and positively to that Society. We aim to give each student the confidence and

satisfaction derived from a sense of achievement and to promote in them a lively and enquiring

mind, capable of rational judgement and disciplined imagination.


What are the entry requirements?

All students who did not achieve at least grade 4 at the end of Year 11 will study GCSE Mathematics


How Will I Be Assessed?

The GCSE Mathematics is assessed by three exams. Paper 1 is a non-calculator and other two papers

are calculator papers.


What extra costs are involved?

Students will be required to bring their own scientific calculator to each lesson. They may not use

a mobile phone for this purpose in Mathematics as mobile phones are not allowed in examinations and

they need to be familiar with using their own calculator.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr P Strzelec, piotr.strzelec@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

AQA website: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/mathematics/gcse/mathematics-8300


GCSE Media


What will I learn?

Media Studies at GCSE level introduces ideas and practice to students who desire to understand the

meanings behind the images seen in film, television, magazine and on e-media platforms. The focus

for the students will be surrounding their pre-production/planning skills; which could entail

storyboarding, poster design, print advertising design and scripting for film. television and

radio. Secondly, they will look at putting this into practice with their production skills with

will give the opportunity to create still images, use video/digital cameras and finally use editing

techniques to produce finished products. Finally, evaluation skills will be demonstrated to

effectively evaluate their production work in light of media practices.

As a candidate you will learn the four key concepts which form the basis of the subject content.

This include media language : forms and conventions, industries, audiences and representation.

Looking at these areas will be supported by contemporary examples within the media to help with the

students learning.


How will I be assessed?

  • Written Exam 1 :1 hour 30 minutes. Questions will focus on three areas of the theoretical

    framework: industries, audiences and representation.Multiple choice, short answer and extended

    response questions. 35% of GCSE

  • Written Exam 2 : 1 hour 30 minutes. Questions will focus on media language and contexts of the

    media. Students will be expected to analyse media products both in relation to the theoretical

    framework and their contexts. Multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions. 35% of

    GCSE.

  • Non-Exam Assessment - Creating a Media Product : Application of knowledge and understanding of the

    theoretical framework. Practical skills relating to the media format of their choice. A choice of

    topics related to the over-arching (annually changing) theme.


Future opportunities?

The opportunities which are available for those students who study Media can lead to Higher

education; Newspaper design; Magazine design; Journalism; Television production; Radio production;

Marketing; Editing; 'New media' jobs; e­media; Development; Teaching and Lecturing as well as many

other vocations.



Course contact: Mr A Smith, ali.smith@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination Board: AQA


GCSE Psychology


What will I learn?

The GCSE course is designed to encourage you to explore five big questions:

  • How do we see our world?
  • Is dreaming meaningful?
  • Do TV and video games affect young people’s behaviour?
  • Why do we have phobias?
  • Are criminals born or made?

Whilst exploring these five big questions, you will develop your skills as a Psychological

researcher and learn how to evaluate Psychological studies.


How will I be assessed?

The examination board for this course is Edexcel and assessment is through two examinations; both

in the summer.


What are the entry requirements?

The usual Level 2 Course entry requirements.


What are the costs?

There are no compulsory additional costs. However, there is the opportunity to purchase the

textbook.


Future opportunities?

GCSE Psychology is an excellent introduction to Psychology and leads onto the A Level Psychology

course. Psychology bridges between the arts-based and the science-based subjects, combining well

with subjects such as Science and Health & Social Care.


Who should I contact for additional information?

For further information please contact: Mrs Emma Latchman

emma.latchman@biddenhm.beds.sch.uk@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination Board: Edexcel

Useful information regarding the course can be viewed on the Edexcel website:

http://www.edexcel.com/quals/gcse/gcse09/psychology/Pages/default.aspx


BTEC Work Skills


What will I learn?

WorkSkills is an Edexcel BTEC qualification that has been developed after a lot of research and

consultation with employers, training providers, schools and colleges.
The aim of WorkSkills is to help you improve your knowledge, understanding and skills needed to

gain and retain a job.

A recent survey from the CBI showed that most employers want employees with a positive attitude and

wider employability skills to succeed in the workplace. The survey suggested that, ‘these wider

employability skills should include: general communication skills, applied numeracy, team working,

problem solving and integrity’. WorkSkills provides these skills.

The course consists of 18 credits, the equivalent to 2 GCSE’s C grade ( some universities count as

1 ). All the work is completed over one year and is related to employment based situations. This

allows you to learn by completing assignments that are based on realistic workplace situations. You

will use independent learning skills to research information from a variety of sources and have the

opportunity to explore case studies from different types of jobs.

The course introduces you to particular areas of employment and provides a good basis to progress

to advanced work-related qualifications. We have excellent links with local employers and they will

also be involved in assessment.


How will I be assessed?

Each unit is assessed and graded by a portfolio piece of work. You will receive feedback on your

progress throughout the course. Evidence of coursework can be recorded through a number of means

such as PowerPoint presentations, wall displays, Word reports, role play assessment and working in

teams.


What are the entry requirements?

No prior knowledge is required.
The units build on the skills taught in schools and colleges and offer the opportunity to recognise

these skills with a formal BTEC qualification.


What extra costs may be involved?

There will be visits connected to the course which will be used as case studies to enhance

knowledge, skills and understanding of the units being studied.


Anything else I need to know?

The course will appeal if you:

  • Would like to gain more information and experience of work related skills and knowledge.
  • Want to find out more about career progression through research, teamwork and independent

    study.

  • Enjoy studying an area that will broaden your experiences.
  • Want the opportunity to apply the theory of the course to practical work in the workplace.
  • Enjoy discovering about yourself in ‘hands-on’ situations.
  • Wish to study a course which is active, fun and enjoyable.


Future opportunities?

Study further BTEC and other qualifications or apprenticeship.
Progress into a career in a wide range of jobs having experienced the skills which are used in any

workplace.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Head of Department, Mrs B Darlow, beverley.darlow@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

The exam board is Edexcel http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-

workskills/level-2.html

LEVEL 3 COURSES


16 - 19 LEVEL 3 COURSES


Entry requirements

  • Grade 4 English Language and Maths qualifications and a minimum of 3 other Level 2

    qualifications at C grade/grade 4 or above

  • or

  • Grade 4 English language and a minimum of 6 other Level 2 qualifications at C grade/grade 4 or

    above

If insufficient students choose particular options, we may be unable to run the classes. We may

need to limit the number of students admitted to particular classes for education or health and

safety reasons. We reserve the right to rearrange the option choices if we feel this will improve

the curriculum for a greater number of students.

The School gives no guarantee at this stage that all possible subject combinations will, in fact,

be available. Consequently, students are urged to include a ‘fifth option’ which they would be

happy to take if their first four preferences cannot be accommodated, especially if they are

undecided between subjects and/or if they do not obtain results that enable them to study one of

their original four choices.

Courses Course Entry Requirements
Applied Courses  
BTEC Business 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
BTEC IT 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
WJEC Level 3 in Criminology 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
BTEC Sport Full course PE GCSE at grade B or above.
OR Dance GCSE at grade

B or above.

BTEC Travel & Tourism 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
BTEC Enterprise and Entrepreneurship 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
Cambridge Technical in Health and Social Care 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements and at least D in

Science

GCE (AS/A2) Level 3 Courses  
GCE Art, Craft and Design Art, Graphics or Textiles GCSE at grade C or above. Students who

have not studied Art for 12 months or more will need to complete a portfolio of tasks which would

be independently assessed.

GCE Biology GCSE Maths at grade 6 or above.
Additional Science GCSE or

Biology GCSE at grade B or above.

GCE Chemistry Maths GCSE at grade 7 or above.
Additional

Science GCSE or Chemistry GCSE at grade B or above.

GCE Computer Science Maths GCSE at grade 6 or above.
Physics or Chemistry GCSE at

grade B or above OR Computing GCSE at grade C or above.

GCE Dance Dance GCSE at grade C or above OR appropriate relevant dance

experience assessed by audition where necessary.
English GCSE at grade 4 or above.

GCE Drama Drama GCSE at grade C or above OR appropriate relevant drama

experience assessed by audition where necessary.
English GCSE at grade 4 or above.

GCE Economics English GCSE at grade 5 or above.
Maths GCSE at grade 5 or

above.

GCE English Literature English Language and Literature GCSE, both at grade 6 or above.
GCE French French GCSE at grade B or above.
GCE Geography 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements ideally including GCSE

Geography at C or above.

GCE German German GCSE at grade B or above.
GCE Government & Politics 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
GCE Graphic Design Design Technology GCSE, Art & Design GCSE, Textiles GCSE at

grade C or above.
Students who have not studied one of these subjects for 12 months or more

will need to complete a portfolio of tasks which would be independently assessed.

GCE History 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements ideally including GCSE

History at C or above.

GCE Law 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
GCE Mathematics Maths GCSE at grade 7 or above.
GCE Core Maths Maths GCSE at grade 8.
GCE Further Mathematics Maths GCSE at grade A.
GCE Media Studies 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
GCE Physics Maths GCSE at grade 7 or above.
Additional

Science GCSE or Physics GCSE at grade B or above.

GCE Photography Preferably Art related GCSE at grade C or above, or evidence of own

creative work.
NB: Students must provide their own camera.

GCE Psychology Maths grade 4 and a Science at grade C or above.
GCE Religious Studies GCSE Religious Studies at grade C or above and grade 4 or above in

English.

GCE Sociology 16-19 Level 3 course entry requirements
GCE Spanish Spanish GCSE at grade B or above.

Core Curriculum

GCE Core Mathematics


What will I learn?

Level 3 Mathematical Studies is an accredited Core Maths qualification. Brought in by the

Government in 2014, Core Maths is designed for students with a grade C or above in GCSE maths who

wants to take the subject further, but aren’t moving forward with another post-GCSE maths course.

The use of real-life scenarios will appeal to students who prefer a less academic approach and

appreciate the value of everyday maths and problem-solving skills. Mathematical skills learned

during this course will also support other As-levels starting from Biology, Chemistry, Economics,

Business, Psychology and even PE. Furthermore, it supports students through further/higher

education and is useful in future employment.

It’s all about using and applying Maths. With 80% of the maths content taken from the new GCSE, the

emphasis is on helping students to use the maths they already know to explore, understand and solve

problems. Another 20% of content is taken from Maths AS Level to extend students’ knowledge.


The qualification has the same UCAS tariff points as an ASlevel.


How will I be assessed?

Paper 1 (compulsory content, taken by all students) assesses:

  • analysis of data
  • maths for personal finance
  • estimation.

AND

Paper 2 (optional content – students take one paper only)
either paper 2A assesses:

  • critical analysis of given data and models, including spreadsheets and tabular data
  • statistical techniques

Or paper 2B assesses:

  • critical analysis of given data and models, including spreadsheets and tabular data
  • critical path and risk analysis.

Or paper 2C assesses:

  • critical analysis of given data and models, including spreadsheets and tabular data
  • graphical techniques.


What are the entry requirements?

  • Maths GCSE at grade 5 or above.
  • Level 3 Academic / Technical Course entry requirements.


What are the costs?

There are no additional costs associated with this course


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr P Strzelec, piotr.strzelec@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: AQA, www.aqa.org.uk/coremaths

Extended Project Qualification

What will I learn?

This is a ½ A-Level qualification and is graded A* E. An A* is worth 28 UCAS points.
The Project can be on any topic you wish (but your supervisor will have to approve your choice).


How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed on three things:

  • A Project Log which records your plans and how they changed, the key decisions you made, and

    the problems you solved.

  • A Product which can be:
    • a performance.
    • a dissertation (a written report like a long essay).
    • an investigation (for example a series of experiments).
    • an artefact (something you make, such as an art or craft work or a website)
  • A Presentation which can be of a variety of formats but will evaluate your Project.

You will be taught important Project skills:

  • ICT skills to improve your Project Log, your Product and your Presentation.
  • Research skills.
  • Project Management skills including planning and time management.
  • How to write an academic project.
  • Technical skills appropriate to the project you have chosen.



During the process, students will develop as independent, reflective learners and acquire knowledge

and transferable skills that are invaluable for further study and the workplace.


What are the entry requirements?

Level 3 Academic / Technical Course entry requirements.


What are the costs?

There are no additional costs associated with this course


Future Opportunities?

The Extended Project Qualifications provide students the opportunity to develop extended writing

skills which support all forms of further education, training and employment.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mrs C Burton, caroline.burton@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information:http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/projects/aqa-certificate/EPQ-7993

Level 3 Subject Information


NB: ALL course subjects are subject to availability.

BTEC Applied Law


What will I learn?

Applied Law aims to provide foundation in the main principles of the English Legal System. The core

unit provides the learner with the necessary introductory knowledge and understanding about the

operation of the English legal system. This unit gives students an introduction to the court

structure both civil and criminal, the ways in which law is made and elements of substantive civil

and criminal law. The core will provide a base for study of the three selected specialist units.

Mandatory Units (Year 12):

  • Dispute Solving in the Legal System;
  • Understanding Law Making;
  • Aspects of Legal Liability

Specialist Units (Year 13):

  • Unlawful Homicide and Police Powers;
  • Aspects of Property Offences and Police Powers;
  • Consumer Law;


How will I be assessed?

Assessment is all based on coursework which will be graded as a Pass, Merit or Distinction based on

criteria set by the examining body. There are no exams.


What are the entry requirements?

Level 3 Academic / Technical Course entry requirements.


What are the costs?

Students may be expected to pay towards any necessary trips or visits. We may visit the local and

central London law courts, the Houses of Parliament and attend conferences organised by external

bodies.


Future opportunities

This is a BTEC National specification in Applied Law. It is designed to appeal to students

interested in a career in Law. Progression opportunities will be into Higher Education or into

employment.

A large majority of our students go onto to study Law at university. The study of Applied Law

allows students to make an informed choice about whether a career in the law is the right option

for them. Those students who go onto to study other subjects at university have through the study

of law developed essential skills to equip them for higher education.

Law graduates go on to train as solicitors or barristers or alternatively find employment in most

areas: legal, local government, public sector, administration, business, personnel, banking,

retail, tourism, etc.

The qualification also allows progression through employment as a Paralegal or Trainee Legal

Executive as an alternative route into the Legal Profession as well as other areas of employment.


Additional information

This course will not be offered from September 2017 onward.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Mrs Kuldip Saggu

Head of Law & Assistant Head of Sixth Form

Course contact: Mrs K Saggu, kuldip.saggu@biddenham.beds.sch.uk Tel: 01234 334537

The exam board is Edexcel: http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-

nationals/applied-law-2010.html


BTEC Applied Science

The aim of this course is to provide a broad scientific knowledge for students interested in

continuing their science education and possibly looking for careers in science related industry.

This course is suitable for students who enjoy a wide variety of learning styles. As it is

portfolio based, there is the opportunity to make use of your strengths and look for support on

your weaknesses. You will especially enjoy the course if you like the challenge of independent

research, supported by directed classroom activities such as practicals, lectures and group work.

It is a full-time vocational qualification that is equivalent to 2 GCE qualifications and their

equivalent UCAS points. Students will extend their skills in a range of practical and taught, group

and individual activities.


What will I learn?

The course will aim to offer an engaging, student-centred and differentiated learning experience.

The emphasis is on student participation, ranging from completing simple worksheets to carrying out

challenging research exercises and practical activities. Those students working towards Merit and

Distinction level are offered extension activities or more challenging case studies to ensure they

are able to meet the higher grading criteria. Group exercises are also included to encourage team-

working, skill development and peer assessment.

The units covered in the first year are:

  • Unit 1 Fundamentals of Science
  • Unit 4 – Scientific Practical Techniques
  • Unit 2 – Working in the science industry

The units covered in the second year may change, but at present are:

  • Unit 15 – Physiology of human body systems
  • Unit 18 Genetics and Genetic Engineering
  • Unit 12 Physiology of Human Regulation and Reproduction


How will I be assessed?

The Level 3 Diploma in Applied Science consists of two core units plus four specialist units, each

consisting of 60 hours of guided learning. Guided learning hours will be a combination of

timetabled class time and independent study. Each module is assessed using a portfolio of work

produced by the individual student. The contents of the portfolio will vary with each module, but

may include essays, presentations, worksheets, practical write-ups, poster work and research. Work

must be the student's own and any resources used must be referenced correctly at the end of each

piece. There will also be timed pieces of work. These could include specific essays or question

papers set as independent work, but may also be short test papers sat under exam conditions in the

classroom. The course is designed to give opportunities for practical work and industry visits to

make the science more relevant and to give students ideas about possible careers.
Grades are awarded as Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction*.


What are the entry requirements?

Science GCSE at grade C or above OR Science BTEC level 2 at Merit or above.


Who is the course for?

This course is suitable for students who wish to learn through applied learning techniques,

therefore applying learning which will be directly beneficial for the workplace (the science

industry). Students need to have a strong interest in science and the ability to develop a range of

scientific skills.


Future opportunities?

Many students who study the BTEC route consider a career in the research science field or as a

technician. However, with the relevant work experience candidates could progress onto careers in

management, teaching or higher level research.
Other possible career paths could include forensics, food manufacturing, environment and

conservation, animal health and breeding, engineering and aerospace.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr P Naidoo, pregs.naidoo@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: Edexcel


BTEC Business


What will I learn?

The aim of the course is to provide learners with a broad understanding of the business world on a

local, national and international scale. BTEC Business is a practical, work-related course which is

ideal for students who have an interest in Business, management, accounting, human resources or

marketing. Alternatively it is suited to those students seeking to be self employed or those that

see themselves as the next Richard Branson or Jane Asher. This course is suitable for students who

enjoy a wide variety of learning styles as it combines a range of internally and externally

assessed units.

The course is as follows:

Year 12

Unit 1- Exploring a Business (Written Internally assessed coursework)

Unit 2 - Developing a Marketing campaign (Written externally assessed controlled task)

Year 13

Unit 3 - Personal and Business Finance (Written externally assessed examination)

Unit 8- Recruitment and Selection Process (Written Internally assessed coursework)


What are the entry requirements?

Previous knowledge of Business Studies is not necessary.

Students will gain a valuable insight from following the news, current affairs and documentaries.
Programmes such as Dragons' Den and The Apprentice are useful too.


How will I be assessed?

The course consists of four units of study, comprising of one internal coursework unit and one

externally assessed unit each year.

The content of the units covered in the first year will include:

1. Exploring a Business (Enterprise, types of business ownership, aims and objectives of business,

groups of people who have an interest in business and factors that affect the environment in which

they operate)

2. Developing a Marketing campaign (How businesses market products, limitations on marketing, uses

of market research, market segmentation, targeting groups and the marketing mix).

The content of the units covered in the second year will include:

3. Personal and Business finance (The role and function of money, different ways to pay, current

accounts, managing personal finance, features of financial institutions, purpose of accounting and

types of income and expenditure, sources of finance, breakeven, cashflow, balance sheets and

liquidity ratios)

4.Recruitment and selection process (Recruitment of staff, selection process, ethical and legal

considerations in recruitment, job applications and interviews and skills)


What are the costs?

There will be visits connected to the course which will be used as case studies to enhance

knowledge, skills and understanding of the units being studied.


Is there anything else I need to know?

The course will appeal if you:

  • Have a genuine interest in business.
  • See yourself as the next Richard Branson, James Caan or Jane Asher.
  • Enjoy studying a subject that will broaden your experiences.
  • Envisage working for yourself in the future.
  • Want the opportunity to apply the theory of the course to practical work outside the

    classroom.

  • Enjoy discovering about yourself in ‘handson real life’ situations.
  • Want to find out more about the subject through research, teamwork and independent study.
  • Wish to study a course which is active, fun and enjoyable.


Future Opportunities?

Careers include both public and private sector employment opportunities in specific areas such as

marketing, ICT, human resource management, planning and accountancy, and general

administrative/managerial trainee posts in both the public sector and with large organisations.


Alternatively, study Business Studies/Management at university as a degree or combining it with

other degrees such as accountancy, Human Resources, ICT and Marketing.

Business Studies is also a good foundation for students who at some future point may wish to go

into self-employment. It also prepares students for a whole range of higher education courses. Over

89% of Business Studies graduates get jobs or go onto further education.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Miss G Buckingham, gemma.buckingham@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: Edexcel http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-

nationals/business-2016.html#tab-1

WJEC Level 3 in Criminology


What Will I learn?

An understanding of criminology is relevant to many job roles within the criminal justice sector,

social and probation work and sociology and psychology. The WJEC Level 3 Diploma in Criminology is

a qualification with elements of psychology, law and sociology. Learning will be focused on the

following key questions:

Not all types of crime are alike. What different types of crime take place in our society? How do

we decide what behaviour is criminal? What is the difference between criminal behaviour and

deviance? How do we explain why people commit crime? What happens to those who commit a crime? Why

and how do we punish people? What organisations do we have in our society to control criminality?

The course will allow learners to learn in such a way that they develop:

  • skills required for independent learning and development
  • a range of generic and transferable skills
  • the ability to solve problems
  • the skills of project based research, development and presentation
  • the fundamental ability to work alongside other professionals, in a professional

    environment

  • the ability to apply learning in vocational contexts


What Are The Entry Requirements?

Level 3 Academic / Technical Course entry requirements.


How Will I Be Assessed?

The course is assessed using a combination of internal and external assessment as follows:

Level 3 Certificate in Criminology (Year 12)

Level 3 Certificate in Criminology (Year 12)
Unit Number Unit Title Assessment Grading
1 Changing Awareness of Crime Internal controlled assessment A to E
2 Criminological Theories External 90 minute examination A to E
Level 3 Diploma in Criminology (Year 13)
3 Crime Scene to Courtroom Internal controlled assessment A to E
4 Crime and Punishment External 90 minute examination A to E


Each unit within the qualification has an applied purpose which acts as a focus for the learning in

the unit. The applied purpose demands learning related to authentic case studies. It also requires

learners to consider how the use and application of their learning impacts on themselves, other

individuals, employers, society and the environment.

All units are equally weighted.


What Are The Costs?

Students will be expected to purchase text books. They may be expected to pay towards any

necessary trips or visits. There will be two conferences that they will be invited to attend in

London. These are organised by external bodies. The cost of these conferences are £20 and £12.50.

In addition there will be travel costs into London. We may also visit a prison, the local and

central London law courts.


Is There Anything Else I need to Know?

The course is designed to give you a clear understanding of criminology. You will be given class

notes, your teacher will deliver the main aspects of each topic, and you will be expected to

undertake individual and group work based on the teacher’s delivery. This may involve carrying out

more detailed research.
There will be a variety of methods to deliver the subject. There will be lectures, question and

answer sessions, individual task work, group work, discussions, role-play, student presentations in

preparation for the controlled assessment for unit 1 & 3, timed exam questions and mock exams for

units 2 & 4. You will be expected to make your own comprehensive revision notes, you will have to

read a lot to reinforce your knowledge and understanding, apply the law to problems and issues;

carry out independent research, willingly contribute to class discussions and activities and be

committed to hard work.


Future opportunities?

The Criminology Course has elements of psychology, law and sociology that complement studies in

humanities. The main purpose of the qualification is to support access to higher education degree

courses, such as:

  • BSc Criminology
  • BA Criminology
  • BA Criminology and Criminal Justice
  • BSc (Hons) Criminology and Psychology
  • LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology
  • BA (Hons) Criminology and Sociology
  • BA (Hons) Criminology
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology and Sociology
  • BSc Criminology with Law


Further Information

Course contact: Mrs K Saggu, kuldip.saggu@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: http://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/criminology/criminology-level-3-

from-2015

BTEC Information Technology

BTEC Level 3 Certificate in IT
BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in IT (Yr 13)


Why Study IT?

  • At the end of 2013 there were more advertised vacancies for IT professionals than there were

    candidates to fill them.

  • Employment in the IT industry is forecast to grow 5 times faster than the UK average with over

    half a million new IT and Telecoms professionals needed over the next 5 years.

  • IT and Telecoms professionals currently earn 41% more than the national average salary.
  • Due to the skills shortage in the UK, many firms are having to recruit from abroad.


What will I learn?

This course is designed for learners who are interested in an introduction to the study of creating

IT systems to manage and share information alongside other subjects, with a view to progressing to

a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in IT. You will develop a common core of

IT knowledge and study areas such as the relationship between hardware and software that form an IT

system, managing and processing data to support business and using IT to communicate and share

information.

The objective of this course is to give you the opportunity to develop your knowledge and skills in

IT systems, systems management and social media in business. This will enable you to progress to

further study in the IT sector or other sectors.

The Units covered in the 1st year:

  • Unit 1:Using social media in Business
  • Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information (External Coursework)

The Units covered in the 2nd year:

  • Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business.
  • Unit 4: Website Development.


What are the entry requirements?

Minimum of three GCSE grades at A*- C (or the equivalent) including EITHER English Language or

Mathematics


How will I be assessed?

Certificate in IT : Equivalent in size to 0.5 of an A Level. 2 units, both

mandatory, of which 1 is external. Mandatory content (100%). External assessment (50%).

Extended Certificate : Equivalent in size to one A Level. 4 units of which 3 are

mandatory and 2 are
external. Mandatory content (83%). External assessment (58%).

Who is this course for?

This course is suitable for learners who wish to learn through applied learning techniques,

therefore applying learning which will be directly beneficial for the workplace or future studies

in the digital IT Industry. You will need to have a strong interest in IT and the digital world

today


Future Opportunities?

Studying BTEC Nationals in IT builds a good foundation for a range of career options including:

  • starting up your own business being self employment
  • further education
  • joining the IT industry
  • IT apprenticeships


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mrs Beverley Darlow or Mr George Foy


beverley.darlow@biddenham.beds.sch.uk or george.foy@biddenham.beds.sch.uk


Examination board: Edexcel Specifications


BTEC Sport

BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in Sport (2 year course)


What will I learn?

The course will aim to offer an engaging, student-centred and differentiated learning experience.

The emphasis is on student participation, ranging from carrying out challenging research exercises

and practical activities to exam question structured lessons. Those students working towards merit

and distinction level are offered extension activities or more challenging case studies to ensure

they are able to meet the higher grading criteria.

The Units covered over the two years;
Unit 1 – Anatomy and Physiology
Unit 2 – Fitness Training and Programming for Health Sport and Well being
Unit 3 – Professional Development in the Sports Industry
Unit 17 – Sport Psychology


How will I be assessed?

67% of the course is assessed through 2 exams. Unit 1 is an unseen exam paper sat at the end of

year 12. Unit 2 has pre released material where you will prep for the exam using the scenario given

and take your notes into the exam. You will sit this exam in January of year 13. Both papers have

one re sit opportunity.

The 2 other units will be coursework throughout the 2 years (33% of the course) which builds up

into a portfolio of evidence. Students are set assignments which involved completing a series of

tasks within a specific deadline. As well as written assignments, students can be assessed through

group work, laboratory reports, phase tests, presentations and practical tests. Students will also

develop their skills during either a residential at Derby University using their sport science labs

or at St George’s Park. Cost of these visits T.B.C.


What are the entry requirements?

Full course PE GCSE at grade B or above OR Dance GCSE at grade B or above OR Sport BTEC level 2 at

Merit or above.


Who is the course for?

This course is suitable for students who wish to learn through applied learning techniques,

therefore applying learning which will be directly beneficial for the workplace, the sports

industry.

Students need to have a strong interest in sport and the physical ability to develop a range of

sporting activities. There are several units which require students to perform to a high level and

be able to influence their own performance and that of others.


Future opportunities

Courses like the BTEC Sport develop students skills, enabling them to exit into roles from each

level of the courses offered. The skills students develop will prepare them for life within the

sports industry, but these skills are not exclusive and can be easily transferred into a wide

variety of occupations.
There are opportunities to progress into employment areas such as public and private leisure/health

careers. This course will also enable successful students to access higher education, for example

degrees in Sports Science/Studies, Coaching, PE Teaching, Physiotherapy, Sports Psychology are a

few examples of a huge number of course choices this qualification can open the doors to.

Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Miss P Copley. phillipa.copley@mybiddenham.com


Examination board: Edexcel http://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-

nationals/sport-2016.html


BTEC Travel & Tourism

What will I learn?

The BTEC Subsidiary Diploma is a practical, work-related course which is ideal for students who

have an interest in the Travel & Tourism industry.
It consists of six coursework units based on the real industry, involving visits and guest

speakers, over the two year period.

This allows students to learn by:

  • Completing assignments that are based on realistic workplace situations.
  • Using independent learning skills to research information from a variety of sources.
  • Exploring case studies of travel and tourism organisations within the UK and Europe.
  • Investigating the business of travel and tourism, customer service, current issues and holiday
    destinations.


How is it assessed?

Each unit is assessed and graded by means of a portfolio piece of work.

What subjects will be covered in the 1st year?
Investigating the Travel & Tourism sector.
Working in the Travel and Tourism Industry.
The UK as a Destination.

What subjects will be covered in the 2nd year?
Customer Service in Travel and Tourism.
The Business of Tourism
Long-haul Travel Destinations.

The course will appeal if you:

  • Have a genuine interest in the Travel and Tourism industry. You will be developing an

    understanding of organisations the markets they serve, working with customers, current issues, the

    location of UK and European holiday destinations and the business of travel and tourism.

  • Enjoy studying a subject that will broaden your experiences.
  • Want the opportunity to apply the theory of the course to practical work outside the

    classroom.

  • Want to find out more about the subject through research, teamwork and independent study.
  • Wish to study a course which is active, fun and enjoyable.


Future Opportunities?

  • Travel or work abroad.
  • Follow a related degree at university.
  • Work in the Travel and Tourism industry in any of the following roles: travel agents, holiday

    rep, travel consultant, tourism officer, hotel management, human resources, sales and marketing,

    customer service and event management.

For further details speak to Beverley Darlow, Head of Department in R01 or R7


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mrs B Darlow, beverley.darlow@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: http://www.edexcel.com/iama/student/Pages/home.aspx


GCE Art, Craft & Design: Fine Art, Graphics & Textiles


What will I learn?

Do you enjoy exploring ideas and looking at things in a different way? At Biddenham we offer a

broad-based course exploring practical, critical and contextual work through a range of 2D and 3D

processes and media. The course is practical in nature and will give you the ability and skills to

appreciate the visual world and respond in an imaginative and personal way.

If you have an adventurous, creative and enquiring mind and are excited by shaping and determining

the visual world around us, then there is a career opportunity waiting for you. The course prepares

students for employment and/or further studies beyond A Level Art and Arts related courses.

There are four units in this course, two taken in the Lower Sixth and two in the Upper Sixth. The

Lower Sixth areas of study lead to an AS in Art and Design and this can be taken as a stand alone

subject or as half of the full A Level Course.

There are three routes on offer:

  • FINE ART
  • TEXTILES
  • ART, CRAFT & DESIGN

Fine Art
Drawing, painting, mixed media, Sculpture and digital photography

Textiles
Working with a range of materials and techniques, e.g. shibori, dyeing, printing, weaving and

fashion,

Graphics
Typography, Illustration, Advertising, Packaging, Branding, Design

Art Craft and Design
You must work in a minimum of two Areas in unit one.

For the first term you will experience all three subject areas and be introduced to a range of

associated skills. As the course proceeds you will be able to select the direction that you want to

study in more depth.
The three routes are linked by emphasis and similarity in terms of CREATIVE THINKING. Drawing

techniques will be on aspects of visual investigation and used for the development of ideas.

In lessons the skills developed will be varied: Among them will be a working knowledge of

materials, processes and techniques. Imaginative powers and critical abilities will be developed

experientially.

Lessons will involve drawing/photographing various stimuli for the formation and development of

visual ideas. You will practice various techniques and then experiment to extend and apply these

skills. This creative process is annotated to interlink practice and critical thinking, e.g. what

makes Modern-Art Modern? and takes the form of a visual diary.

AS and A ‘Level are practical courses in which you learn by doing. You will learn a range of

practical techniques and processes and develop your creativity and independent thought; learn to

express yourself visually. Whatever practical area is chosen it will be underpinned by drawing

techniques and the investigation of relevant art and design theory to support the development of

ideas. Art and Design in a great companion to all other subjects as imagination and problem solving

skills can give you insights for your other studies.


How will I be assessed?

A Level
The ‘A’ Level is a two year linear course.

At the start of the course you will experience a range of Art, Craft and Design practices to

introduce you to different skills areas. Later in the course as the projects become more

personalised you will develop a more specialised direction.

Coursework: Personal Investigation: 60% of the qualification

Y13 - Externally Set Assignment; Practical examination: 40% of the qualification

The lower sixth year will be building up skills. In the Upper sixth year students will write a

Personal Study and pursue more personal lines of enquiry.

NB: Students who have not studied Art for 12 months or more will need to complete a portfolio of

tasks which would be independently assessed.

The best foundation for success in Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced GCE in Art is a good grade at

GCSE. However, if you have aptitude for the subject, if you are creative or good at drawing you may

have the basic skills to succeed. However, this course is not an easy option and you should be

prepared to work hard at developing your abilities. You should have an understanding of the basic

elements of art - and also some understanding of the place of art and design in the world, its

history and its purpose. Above all you should have enthusiasm for the subject.


Future opportunities

There are many careers in Art and Design. You may want to take ‘A’ Level Art, Craft & Design for

its’ own sake or perhaps to form the basis of a future specialist interest or as part of a range of

other subjects. You might wish to go into a job where it is useful to have had experience of Art

and Design or where you will need to use some of the skills developed during this course. These

might include careers in such fields as advertising, marketing, design, architecture, publishing

and media. The study of art can also help you develop transferable skills you can take into any

career or job.
Many students go on to study the Foundation Course in Art and Design before specialising in Art or

Design at Degree Level.

Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr A Kavanagh, allan.kavanagh@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: http//www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/art,craft&design/specification/


GCE Art & Design: Digital Photography


What will I learn?

Advanced level Photography aims to develop the ability to appreciate the visual world; respond in a

personal and creative way and communicate this through Digital Photography. It prepares students

for employment and/or further studies beyond A Level Art and digital related courses.

There are four units in this course, two taken in the Lower Sixth and two in the Upper Sixth. The

Lower Sixth areas of study lead to an AS in Digital Photography and this can be taken as a stand

alone subject or as half of the full A Level Course.

The areas of study for Digital Photography are composition, viewpoints, focus, shutter speed and

exposure. The use different digital cameras, image manipulation software and the relationship

between colour and tone for screen based media. Students will also use a range of source material

for the development of ideas.

Lessons will involve the use of software such as Adobe Photoshop. studio lighting, critical

analysis as well educational visits and location work.


How will I be assessed?

AS Unit One: Course work 2 projects of practical work, Unit Two Externally Set

Assignment.

A2 Unit Three : Course work (a) Practical Work and (b) Personal Study, Unit Four :

Externally Set Assignment

With regard to the 4 units, 2 are taken in the Lower Sixth and 2 in the Upper Sixth. The Lower

Sixth areas of study lead to an AS in Digital Photography and this can be taken as a stand alone

subject or as half of the full A Level course.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.
  • Preferably Art GCSE at grade C or above.


NB: Students must provide their own camera.

The best foundation for success in Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced GCE in photography is a good

grade at GCSE. However, this isn't a requirement. If you have a creative aptitude for the subject

and are technically minded you may have the basic skills to succeed. However, this course is not an

easy option and you should be prepared to work hard at developing your abilities. You should have

an understanding of the basic elements of colour, tone, composition etc, and also some

understanding of the place of art and design in the world, its history and its purpose. Above all

you should have an interest in creating and understanding art and the determination to develop that

interest.


Future opportunities?

There are many careers in digital Photography. You may wish to take the AS or Advanced GCE for its

own sake or perhaps to form the basis of a future specialist interest or as part of a range of

other subjects. You might wish to go into a job where it is useful to have had experience of

photography or where you will need to use some of the skills developed during this course. These

might include careers in such fields as advertising, marketing, design, architecture, publishing

and media. The study of art can also help you develop transferable skills you can take into any

career or job.

Many students go on to study the Foundation Course in Art and Design before specialising in Art or

Design at Degree Level.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr P Alexis, paul.alexis@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: Edexcel


GCE Biology

The AQA course is approved by the QCA. The study of Biology at Biddenham provides an academic,

practical and broad experience of one of the most relevant and exciting areas in the Sciences.
With a broad range of topics in the subject, GCE Biology provides many natural links to other

subjects providing an extremely useful and supportive basis for them. Subjects commonly taken with

Biology include Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics, PE and

Geography, although many other subjects have been studied with Biology at Biddenham such as

History, Art and English. The GCE runs over two years.


What will I learn?

Students will study:

  • Biological molecules
  • Cells
  • Organisms exchange of substances with their environment
  • Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms
  • Energy transfers in and between organisms
  • Organisms responses to changes in their internal and external environments
  • Genetics, populations evolution and ecosystems
  • The control of gene expression


How will I be assessed?

A Level Examination 7402

There are three 2 hour exams. The first assesses content from the first year topics as well as

practical skills and contributes 35% to the A level. The second exam also contributes 35% to the A

level and assesses content from the second year topics as well as practical skills. The final exam

assesses content from the two years and practical skills and contributes 30% to the A level.

10% of the total A-level marks require the use of Level 2 (Higher tier GCSE) mathematical skills.

Students will also be assessed on their practical skills throughout the two year course and will be

awarded a pass or a fail based on their competencies. Whilst this does not make up part of their A

level, they will be assessed on their practical knowledge and understanding in the written exams

and a pass would be necessary to demonstrate skills for scientific courses at university.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above
  • Maths GCSE at grade B or above
  • Additional Science GCSE OR Biology GCSE at grade B or above.


What are the costs?

Textbooks are likely to cost about £25 for each year if bought new or students may loan a textbook

with a £10 deposit.

A field trip may run in the second year (subject to numbers) and though not compulsory, students

would find this useful to support the theory work covered in lessons.


Future opportunities?

The Biology Department has had an excellent progression history with students going on to

University studies and vocational courses. Medical students, biochemists and many other biology-

related professions have been followed after A level.


Additional information

Homework – this forms a major part of any subject at GCE A level. Research and independent study is

a major component of the Biology course and prepares the student for study at University level.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Ms M Brooks, May.brookscaffrey@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science/as-and-a-level


GCE Chemistry

A Level Chemistry will give you an exciting insight into the contemporary world of chemistry. It

covers the key concepts of chemistry and practical skills are integrated throughout the course.

This combination of academic challenge and practical focus makes the prospect of studying A Level

Chemistry highly appealing. You will learn about chemistry in a range of different contexts and the

impact it has on industry and many aspects of everyday life. You will learn to investigate and

solve problems in a range of contexts.


What will I learn?

In year 12:
Module 1 – Development of practical skills in chemistry: Practical skills assessed

in a written examination

Module 2 – Foundations in chemistry; Atoms, compounds, molecules and equations;

Amount of substance; Acid–base and redox reactions; Electrons, bonding and structure.

Module 3 – Periodic table and energy: The periodic table and periodicity; Group 2

and the halogens; Qualitative analysis; Enthalpy changes; Reaction rates and equilibrium

(qualitative).

Module 4 – Core organic chemistry: Hydrocarbons; Alcohols and haloalkanes; Organic

synthesis; Analytical techniques (IR and MS).

In year 13:
Module 5 – Physical chemistry and transition elements: Reaction rates and

equilibrium (quantitative); pH and buffers; Enthalpy, entropy and free energy; Redox and electrode

potentials; Transition elements.

Module 6 – Organic chemistry and analysis: Aromatic compounds; Carbonyl compounds;

Carboxylic acids and esters; Nitrogen compounds; Polymers; Organic synthesis; Chromatography and

spectroscopy (NMR).


How will I be assessed?

There will be 3 exams at the end of year 13. Two of the exams are 2 hours 15 minutes long and each

contribute 37% of the final grade. The first of these is on the periodic table, elements and

physical chemistry which covers topics taught in modules 1,2,3 and 5. The second exam is on

synthesis and analytical techniques which covers topics from modules 1, 4 and 6. The final of the 3

exams is 1 hour 30 minutes long and is worth 26% of the final mark and is synoptic, potentially

covering any area from the course.

Students will also be assessed on their practical skills throughout the two year course and will be

awarded a pass or a fail based on their competencies. Whilst this does not make up part of their A

level, they will be assessed on their practical knowledge and understanding in the written exams

and a pass would be necessary to demonstrate skills for scientific courses at university.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.
  • Maths GCSE at grade B/6 or above.
  • Additional Science GCSE OR Chemistry GCSE at grade B or above.
  • For students who have taken BTEC level 2 courses, a DISTINCTION is required as well as grade B

    in English and Maths GCSE.


What are the costs?

The course may include visits to local chemical industries

Textbooks need to be bought.

Two textbooks for the A2 course, both published by Pearson Education. One covers all the content

from year 12 and one for year 13. (books are £20 each bought new)

Laboratory coats and safety spectacles are advisable, particularly if taking more than one

science.

Total cost is about £50:00.


Is there anything else I need to know?

Other subjects that would go well with Chemistry at AS or GCE Advanced level are Biology,

Mathematics and Physics. However, other combinations of subjects including Geology and Geography

are also suitable. Students who are concentrating on Arts, Humanities or Modern Language subjects

may wish to take Chemistry to AS level to broaden their studies by continuing to take a Science

subject.


The demands of the course

The sixth form is a bridge between school and university. Students will be responsible for their

own learning. Teachers are there to help students learn how to learn. AS level will be a

continuation of GCSE Chemistry, but at a consistently higher standard and in more depth. The

student must be committed to understanding the fundamental concepts of Chemistry in order to make

satisfactory progress, through problem resolution.

The A2 course is even more demanding, where the entire course (AS and A2) is synoptically assessed.

It is essential to understand the AS topics in order to make the necessary links between topics

that become more complex. However, it is normally at this stage that Chemistry begins to make

sense, where all the aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and the reasons why chemical

reactions happen merge together into a coherent pattern of events. Almost all students find the

Chemistry course a challenge. Due to the rigorous nature of the course, homework is set at the end

of every lesson

All resources are fully accessible using the school’s intranet. The course is modular in structure

with emphasis on the use of Chemistry in everyday life


Future Opportunities?

With a qualification in Chemistry a student could go on to Further or Higher Education, studying

Chemistry or one of the other sciences or related subjects, such as Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry,

Law, Veterinary Science, Chemical Engineering, Forensic Science, Civil Service, Environmental

Science or Agriculture. Many science-based industries are now looking to recruit GCE level students

who show an aptitude for Chemistry and have the right attitude towards a working environment, with

a view to giving students the opportunity to study at a higher level through one day a week

release.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr K Walker, karl.walker@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination Board: OCR A http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-chemistry-a-h032-h432

-from-2015/


GCE Computer Science


What will I learn?

This course has been designed for students who wish to go on to higher education courses or

employment where knowledge of computing would beneficial. One can study computing and go on to a

career in medicine, law, business, politics or any type of science. Students following this course

do not need to have any prior knowledge of computing, but it would be of substantial advantage.

The new course places a much stronger emphasis on problem solving and applied mathematics.

The course is not about learning to use tools or just training in a programming language. Instead,

the emphasis is on computational thinking. Computational thinking is a kind of reasoning used by

both humans and machines. Thinking computationally means using abstraction and decomposition and is

an important life skill. Computer Science involves questions that have the potential to change how

we view the world. For example, we may be computing with DNA at some stage in the future, with

computer circuits made of genes. This leads to the question, does the natural world ‘compute’?

Computing is about designing new algorithms to solve new problems. In this sense Computer Science

is no more about computers than astronomy is about telescopes. Many great challenges lie in the

future for computer scientists to solve. This course, with its emphasis on abstract thinking,

general problem-solving, algorithmic and mathematical reasoning, scientific and engineering-based

thinking, is a good foundation for understanding these future challenges.

In the AS specification there are two units. Unit 1 is a practical, on-screen examination which

allows candidates to demonstrate their knowledge of the fundamental principles of the subject,

focusing on programming through a problem solving scenario using pre-release material. Unit 2

focuses on the hardware and software aspects of computing and the social and economic consequences

of computing.

The A2 specification builds on the content of AS, with Unit 3 focusing on computational thinking,

what can be computed, programming and problem-solving including communication and networking. The

second unit, Unit 4, is an internally assessed unit, with candidates required to complete a report

on a computer-based programmed solution to a problem solving exercise of their choice.


How will I be assessed?

There are four units and each has its own assessment:

Paper 1

  • This paper tests a student's ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of

    computer science from subject content 10–13 in the specification and the skills required from

    section 22.

  • On-screen exam.
  • 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

Paper 2:

  • This paper tests a student's ability to answer questions from subject content 14–21 in the

    specification.

  • Written exam
  • 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

Non-exam Assessment:

  • The non-exam assessment assesses student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained

    through the course to solve or investigate a practical problem. Students will be expected to follow

    a systematic approach to problem solving, as shown in section 22 of the specification.

  • 75 marks
  • 20% of A-level.


What are the entry requirements?

Physics OR Chemistry GCSE at grade B or above AND Maths GCSE at grade B or above OR Computing GCSE

at grade C or above.


Is there anything else I need to know?

This course has been designed to encourage candidates to develop a broad range of skills and

knowledge of computing as a basis for progression into further learning, including progression from

AS to A2, and/or employment in computing related fields.

A-Level specifications in computing should encourage students to develop:

  • The capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and

    critically.

  • An understanding of the organisation of computer systems including software, hardware,

    data,communications and people.

  • The ability to apply skills, knowledge and understanding of computing, including programming,

    in arange of contexts to solve problems.

  • Project and time management skills.
  • The capacity to see relationships between different aspects of the subject and perceive their

    field of study in a broader perspective.

  • An understanding of the consequences of uses of computing, including social, legal, ethical and

    other issues.

  • An awareness of emerging technologies and an appreciation of their potential impact on

    society.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr A Parish, antony.parish@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/ict-and-computer-science/as-and-a-

level/computer-science-7516-7517


GCE Dance


What will I learn?

Students study all aspects of dance including choreography, performance and appreciation through

practical and written work. The specification for A-level allows for more variety in the curriculum

and a practical approach to the teaching of theory. Theory for A-level includes: analysis of

professional dance works, dance history, the theory of choreography and reflective practice. Visits

to the theatre and practical workshops form an important part of this course
000


How will I be assessed?

A Level - Component 1 - Performance & Choreography Practical Exam - 50% of A level

  • Solo performance linked to a specified practitioner within an area of study (choreographed with/by

    the teacher - 2- 3 minutes)

  • Performance in a quartet (choreographed with/by the teacher - 3-4 minutes)
  • Group choreography (choreographed by the student - 3-4 minutes)

A Level - Component 2 - Critical Engagement - Written Exam (2hrs 30mins) - 50% of A level

  • Knowledge, understanding and critical appreciation of two set works.:

    Christopher Bruce’s Rooster in the context of Rambert Dance Company

    Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring in the context of American Modern Dance
  • Questions Two sections:

Section A: short answer questions (25 marks) and one essay question (25 marks) on one of the set

works.

Section B: two essay questions on the second set work/area of study (25 marks for each essay).


What are the entry requirements?

  • Dance GCSE grade C or above OR appropriate relevant Dance experience assessed by audition where

    necessary.

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.
  • NB: Students must also be willing to perform in front of others.


What are the costs?

Theatre trips to see live dance works will be arranged throughout the year and where possible

workshops from dance professionals. It is expected that students will attend as many as possible.

The cost is kept as reasonable as possible, with each trip cost approximately £25 (including

transport and tickets).
Rather than financial cost, students are required to make some personal commitments of their own

time. There is a huge range of extra-curricular activities and performances run through the dance

department and 6th Form students are expected to be involved in at least one of these activities

and at least one performance. Such activities include:

  • Street dance club
  • Biddenham Dance Company
  • Body conditioning (fitness training)
  • Theatre trips (Milton Keynes, Cambridge, London etc)
  • Choreographic workshops at the University of Bedfordshire
  • School Musical
  • Internal Dance and Drama showcase
  • "Spring into Dance" internal dance production
  • Performances at the University of Bedfordshire
  • Supporting and teaching lower and middle school students
  • Assisting in GCSE lessons


Who can take the course?

  • Anyone interested in Dance, the arts and theatre, and would like to broaden their

    knowledge.

  • People hoping to go into theatre, teaching or dance as a profession.
  • People who would like a creative contrast to a scientific or mathematical course of study.


Future Opportunities

A-level Dance is a dynamic qualification which encourages students to develop their creative and

intellectual capacity, alongside transferable skills such as team working, communication and

problem solving. All of these are sought after skills by higher education and employers and will

help them stand out in the workplace whatever their choice of career. The analytical nature of

dance theory, the problem solving inherent in choreography, the ability to communicate and the

importance of self-presentation in dance,students will be well equipped for succeeding in today's

workplace, anywhere.

Specific opportunities could include: Dance performer; choreographer; teacher; dance therapist;

arts administrator; dance company education department; a sales environment; marketing and any

career involving the need to be self motivated, creative and to be able to work on own initiative.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Miss H Wiltshire, hayley.wiltshire@biddenham.beds.sch.uk (Head of Dance & Drama)
amy.warden@mybiddenham.com (Teacher of English & Dance)


Exam board information: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/dance/as-and-a-level/dance-7237


GCE Drama

What Will I Learn?

A-level Drama emphasises practical creativity alongside research and theoretical understanding.

Students learn through experience, seeing theatre and making theatre for themselves. Students are

introduced to a wide range of theatrical styles and contexts as they explore plays practically,

devise and work on performances. Students choose to develop as a: • performer • designer (set,

costume, puppets) • director • combination of these. Whichever option they choose, students will

gain many invaluable skills, both theatrical and transferable, to expand their horizons.


How will I be Assessed?

A Level - Component 1: Drama and theatre - Written Exam (3 hrs, open book) - 40% of the A-level

  • Knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre. through the study of two set plays
  • Analysis and evaluation of the work of live theatre makers.
  • Section A: one question (from a choice) on one of the set plays (25 marks).
  • Section B: one three part question on a given extract from the other set play (30 marks).
  • Section C: one question (from a choice) on the work of theatre makers in a single live theatre

    production (25 marks).

A Level - Component 2 : Creating original drama - Written coursework & practical exam - 30% of A-

level

  • Process of creating devised drama.
  • Performance of devised drama (students may contribute as performer, designer or director). -

    The devised piece must be influenced by the work and methodologies of one practitioner.

  • Working notebook (40 marks - coursework)
  • Devised performance (20 marks - practical performance)

A Level - Component 3: Making theatre - Practical exam & Written report - 30 % of A-level

  • Practical exploration and interpretation of three extracts each taken from a different play.

    The methodology of a prescribed practitioner must be applied to the final extract.

  • The final extract is to be performed as a final assessed piece (students may contribute as

    performer, designer or director). (40 marks - practical performance)

  • Reflective written report analysing and evaluating theatrical interpretation of all three

    extracts. (20 marks)


What Are the Entry Requirements?

Drama GCSE grade C or above OR appropriate relevant Drama experience assessed by audition where

necessary.
English GCSE at grade C or above.
NB: Students must also be willing to perform in front of others.


What are the Costs?

The Drama department aims to offer you theatre trips and workshops each year at a cost to cover

travel and ticket for events. All students will be required to attend at least one theatre trip in

order to prepare for the written examination and to inform their understanding of theatre.


There is a rich diversity of activities to get involved in from workshops, performing arts tuition

and performances. Students are encouraged to take part in running events and activities in Drama to

support their experience. All students are required to be involved in at least one extracurricular

activity.


Future Opportunities

Higher education institutions value and respect the skills drama and theatre qualifications give

students.By incorporating the approach universities take with drama and theatre undergraduates into

this A-level, students will be really well prepared for the demands of university and beyond.

Students of Drama and theatre develop skills that are not just essential for drama but applicable

to a wide range of higher education subjects and in the workplace. This course refines students’

collaborative skills, their analytical thinking and their approach to research. Students grow in

confidence and maturity as they successfully realise their own ideas. They learn to evaluate

objectively and develop a sound appreciation of the influences that cultural and social contexts

can have on decision making. Whatever the future holds, students of A-level Drama and Theatre

emerge with a toolkit of transferable skills preparing them for their next steps.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Miss H Wiltshire, hayley.wiltshire@biddenham.beds.sch.uk (Head of Drama & Dance) ,

Miss S Wozniak,
sarah.wozniak@biddenham.beds.sch.uk (Teacher of Drama & English)
Exam board information: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/drama/a-level/drama-and-theatre-7262


GCE Economics


What will I learn?

AS and A level Economics aims to give an insight into key issues in the news affecting everyday

life. The goal is to understand the forces driving things like the price of oil, exchange rates and

the level of unemployment in an economy. Students enjoy Economics because it is contemporary and

rooted in the real world, but at the same time it is always closely related to a clearly explained

set of economic theory that uses statistics and other quantitative methods to support and develop

ideas.

The subject is split into two main sections, microeconomics and macroeconomics. Whereas macro looks

at the big issues affecting the economy as a whole (unemployment, inflation, growth and so on),

micro looks at a smaller scale; the pricing of individual products like oil or gold; the salaries

paid to different people, and the reasons for any differences. Students also study the work of some

key Economic theorists such as Friedrich Hayek, Karl Marx and Adam Smith.

The subject looks at the reasons why changes occur, and builds models to help analyse changes.

Hence a student having studied Economics would understand clearly why prices of oil, copper, gold,

silver and wood fluctuate. They would understand the causes of unemployment in advanced economies,

and why the UK economy has been slower to recover from the global credit crunch than many others.

They would understand why some countries are so much richer than others, and what can be done about

it. They may also feel qualified to voice an opinion about the result of the vote in the EU

referendum!

Taken together, micro and macroeconomics give a complete understanding of the economy as a whole

that will be valuable in career terms as well as bringing an increased understanding of the news!


How will I be assessed?

At Biddenham we follow the Edexcel A course. In September 2015 we started the new specification in

line with recent changes in post 16 education. In September 2016 all students will be completing

the two year ‘A’ level programme although there may be the option of entering the AS examination in

the summer of the first year.


A level Economics

The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Economics A is structured into four themes and consists

of three externally examined papers that must be taken in the same year (each paper is 120

minutes). It is a two year course.

Students will need to apply their knowledge and understanding to both familiar and unfamiliar

contexts in the assessments and demonstrate an awareness of current economic events and policies.


Theme 1: Introduction to markets and market failure


Theme 2: The UK economy – performance and policies


(Themes 1 & 2 are identical to themes 1 & 2 of the AS course and will be taught in the first year

so that all students have the option of taking the AS examination)


Theme 3: Business behaviour and the labour market


This theme develops the microeconomic concepts introduced in Theme 1 and focuses on business

economics.

Students will develop an understanding of:

  • business growth
  • business objectives
  • revenues, costs and profits
  • market structures
  • labour market
  • government intervention.

Theme 4: A global perspective
This theme develops the macroeconomic concepts introduced in Theme 2 and applies these concepts in

a global context. Students will develop an understanding of:

  • international economics
  • poverty and inequality
  • emerging and developing economies
  • the financial sector
  • role of the state in the macroeconomy


Whom does the subject suit?

Anyone with an interest in knowing more about the way the world works. Students take Economics in

combination with a very wide array of other subjects – everything ranging from Art and English

Literature at one end to Further Maths and Physics at the other.

A common misconception is that a strong mathematical background is important for the A level – this

is not true; an ability to understand graphs and correlation is the only mathematical requirement.

Beyond this, all that is needed is an ability to argue a case, to compare theory with reality and

observe the differences, but these are skills needed for almost any academic AS/A level.


Entry Requirements?

Economics is not an easy option so consequently a ‘B’ at GCSE English is required PLUS a ‘C’ at

GCSE Mathematics. There may be some negotiation in special circumstances.


Future opportunities?

Whether or not you go on to read an Economics degree, Economics is well regarded by universities as

a rigorous A level, because of the analytical skills that it teaches. The model-based approach of

the subject gives a good mental framework for almost any subsequent degree.

Statistically, those students who do take a degree in Economics on average command higher starting

salaries out of university, and are more likely to make it into the 'elite' graduate jobs in areas

such as management consultancy.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Ms H Rose, helen.rose@biddenham.beds.sch.uk or follow us on Twitter -

@BISGovPolEcon


Examination board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-a-levels/ec...


GCE English Literature


What will I learn?

The English Literature A specification encourages students to develop interest in and enjoyment of

English Literature, through reading widely, critically and independently, across centuries, genre

and gender, and through experience of an extensive range of views about texts and how to read them.

This specification has a clear philosophy of reading and meaning, and aims to encourage candidates

to develop as informed, independent readers and critics of literary texts. A selection of the

following texts have traditionally formed a core part of the curriculum:

  • Othello , by William Shakespeare.
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
  • An anthology of love poetry through the Ages
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof , by Tennessee Williams
  • Skirrid Hill , by Owen Sheers
  • The Help , by Kathryn Stockett
  • The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath
  • A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen
  • The Yellow Wallpaper , by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys


How will I be assessed?

In total, 20% of the A-level qualification is coursework-based and the remaining 80% of the course

is exam-based. At the end of the A-level course, there are two written exams; paper one lasts for

3 hours, and paper two lasts for 2 hours and 30 minutes.


What are the entry requirements?

GCSE English Language at grade 6 or above and GCSE English Literature at grade 6 or above


Future opportunities

A2 English Literature is a highly regarded qualification which provides a very good basis for the

study of Literature at degree level (including joint degrees). It is also seen as a good measure of

academic potential by universities when allocating places on degree courses for humanities subjects

(including Law). As a subject which enables you to develop your ability to think critically and

write analytically, the skills you will develop studying A2 English literature will never be wasted

and are likely to be viewed favourably by future employers too. Studying English Literature at

degree level can lead to a variety of careers, including journalism, teaching and those in the

communications industry.

Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mrs L. Steward, laura.steward@biddenham.beds.sch.uk
Mrs C. Burton, caroline.burton@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/as-and-a-level/english-literature...


GCE French


What will I learn?

The course aims to develop an understanding of up to date language and contemporary issues from

authentic sources, such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, songs and the Internet. The

target language is used most of the time, in the classroom and in conversation with an Assistant.

‘Taking part’ is vital for success. Students are encouraged to visit a country where the language

is spoken and to take part in the county sixth form exchange programme. In addition, A level

linguists are encouraged to apply for the county work experience scheme, whereby you can spend 2

weeks working in a French firm. In previous years, Biddenham students have worked in offices,

factories and banks gaining tremendous experience and giving themselves a most interesting CV.

Subject content:

  • Social issues and trends
  • Political and artistic culture
  • Grammar

Subject content:

  • Works: Literary text and film

Assessments:

Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing

What’s assessed:

  • Aspects of target language speaking society: current trends
  • Aspects of target language-speaking society: current issues
  • Artistic culture in the target language -speaking world
  • Aspects of political life in the target language-speaking world
  • Grammar

How it’s assessed: Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

  • 100 marks
  • 50% of A-level

Paper 2 writing

  • One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
  • Grammar

How it's assessed: Written exam: 2 hours, 80 marks in total, 20 % of A Level


Paper 3: Speaking

What’s assessed:

  • Individual research project
  • One of four sub themes: Aspects of society: current trends, current issues, artistic culture ,

    aspects of political life

How it’s assessed:

  • Oral exam: 21–23 minutes (including 5 minutes preparation time)
  • 60 marks in total
  • 30% of A-level. Discussion of a sub-theme with the discussion based on a stimulus card (5–6

    minutes). The student studies the card for 5 minutes at the start of the test (25 marks).

  • Presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9–10 minutes) of individual research project (35 marks).

No access to a dictionary during the assessment (including 5 minutes preparation).

Students may take the assessment only once before certification.

Assessments will be conducted by either the centre or a visiting examiner and marked by an AQA

examiner.

For further details please email caroline.piotrowski@mybiddenham.com

What are the entry requirements?

  • French GCSE at grade B or above.

It cannot be denied that there is quite a leap between GCSE and the AS level course, but no more in

Languages than with any of your subjects. A-level courses demand a greater level of self-motivation

and an ability to act on your own initiative; if you possess these qualities then we would welcome

you to the Languages Department to discuss your plans. We will be happy to show you the course

books and would encourage you to chat to students who are currently following the course.

A2 LEVEL
Successful completion of AS level. Pupils achieving Grade D or below at AS should contact the

Department to discuss the possibility of retaking AS units whilst following the A2 course.


What are the costs?

You are expected to have a good, sixth form-standard, bilingual dictionary and a grammar workbook

(the title of which you will be told at the start of the course).

It is anticipated that students will travel to the target language country either through trips

arranged by the Department or via the country run exchanges or work experience. Costs will vary

depending on the nature of the trip.

Day trips to language immersion conferences take place in Year 13. The cost of this is usually

less than £20, plus travel into London.


Future Opportunities?.

Statistics show that students of foreign languages have access to a greater number of career

possibilities and develop a deeper understanding of their own and other cultures. The benefits to

society are many: individuals fluent in other languages enhance our economic competitiveness

abroad, improve global communication, and, some would add, maintain our political and security

interest.

Universities offer not only degree courses in one or more languages. Some degrees integrate the

study of a language with other subjects such as European/ International Studies, Business Studies

or Leisure and Tourism. Other courses combine language study with another subject e.g. Marine

Sciences with French, Spanish and Computer Science. You may even take specialist language options

which relate directly to your main course of study e.g. French for lawyers, German for Engineers.

Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mrs C Piotrowski, caroline.piotrowski@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: AQA


GCE Geography

“Geography graduates are highly employable”.
Times Educational Supplement


"Geography is the subject which holds the key to our future"
Michael Palin


What Will I Learn?

AQA A Level Geography is made up of three components, two of which are examined. This A Level

course has been designed to excite your mind, challenge perceptions and stimulate your

investigative and analytical skills. Thus providing you with the knowledge, skills and enthusiasm

sought by higher education and employers. We have students every year progressing onto university

to read Geography or Geography related degrees.


What Are The Entry Requirements?

  • Geography GCSE at grade C or above.
  • English AND Maths GCSE at grade 4 or above.

Overview of the course: what will I study?

Two components:

  • Physical geography and people and the environment
  • Human geography and geographical fieldwork and investigation
Year Winter Term Spring Term Summer Term Fieldwork/geographical skills
1 Coastal systems and landscapes Hazards Changing Places Geographical Investigation and geographical skills
2 Water and carbon cycles Global systems and global governance Population and environment Geographical Investigation and geographical skills


How will I be assessed?

Component 1: Physical Geography

What’s assessed

Section A: Water and carbon cycles

Section B: either Hot desert systems and landscapes or Coastal systems and landscapes or Glacial

systems and landscapes

Section C: either Hazards or Ecosystems under stress

How it's assessed

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes • 120 marks • 40% of A-level

Component 2: Human geography

What's assessed

Section A: Global systems and global governance

Section B: Changing places

Section C: either Contemporary urban environments or Population and the environment or Resource

security

How it's assessed

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes • 120 marks • 40% of A-level

Component 3: Geographical fieldwork investigation


What's assessed

You will complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The

exam board requires four days of compulsory fieldwork to do this. The individual investigation

must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by you that relates to any part of the

specification content.

How it's assessed

3 000 – 4 000 words • 60 marks • 20% of A-level • marked by teachers • moderated by AQA


By studying geography it will enable you to develop a range of key transferable skills which will

be essential for whatever post-18 opportunities you pursue. The key skills you will be able to

develop during this course are:

  • Critical thinking and critical questioning skills.
  • Informed decision making skills.
  • Data analyses and evaluation skills.
  • Information Technology.
  • Problem solving and lateral thinking skills.
  • Teamwork and leadership.
  • Independent learning and research skills.
  • Effective communication skills (written and verbal).
  • Time Management.
  • Report and essay writing.


costs

To fulfil the fieldwork requirements set by the exam board we offer a residential fieldtrip to the

Dorset coastline which we kindly ask the students to pay for. Further information regarding this

can be obtained from the geography department.


Future opportunities?

All good universities and post-18 institutions look upon geography as a subject that links the Arts

and Sciences; as such it opens up a wide range of higher education and career opportunities; it

does not force you to make an early commitment. It invariably counts as a ‘second science’ and/or a

‘second arts’ subject for most courses at good universities.

Geography combines well with almost all other A Level subjects. Taken with sciences like

mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology, geography supports applications for almost any

science-based university course like engineering, psychology, environmental sciences and geology.

Taken with humanities like English, French, history or economics, geography supports an equally

wide range of university courses such as business, law, media, politics and philosophy.

Course contact: Ms G Buckingham, gemma.buckingham@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: AQA

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/as-and-a-level/geography-7037

For any further assistance or queries please see Ms Buckingham, Head of Geography:

gemma.buckingham@biddenham.beds.sch.uk


GCE German


What will I learn?

The course aims to develop an understanding of up to date language and contemporary issues from

authentic sources, such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, songs and the Internet. The

target language is used most of the time, in the classroom and in conversation with an Assistant.

‘Taking part’ is vital for success. Students are encouraged to visit a country where the language

is spoken and to take part in the county sixth form exchange programme. In addition, A level

linguists are encouraged to apply for the county work experience scheme, whereby you can spend 2

weeks working in a German firm. In previous years, Biddenham students have worked in offices,

factories and banks gaining tremendous experience and giving themselves a most interesting CV.

Topics covered at AS:

  • Media: TV, advertising and communication technology.
  • Popular culture: cinema, music and fashion/trends.
  • Healthy living/lifestyle: sport/exercise, health and wellbeing and holidays.
  • Family/relationships: relationships within the family, friendships and

    marriage/partnerships.


Subject content:

  • Social issues and trends
  • Political and artistic culture
  • Grammar


Option:

  • Works: Literary text and film


Option:

Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing

What’s assessed:

  • Aspects of target language speaking society: current trends
  • Aspects of target language-speaking society: current issues
  • Artistic culture in the target language -speaking world
  • Aspects of political life in the target language-speaking world
  • Grammar


How it’s assessed:
Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

  • 100 marks
  • 50% of A-level


Paper 2 writing

  • One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
  • Grammar


How it's assessed: Written exam: 2 hours, 80 marks in total, 20 % of A Level

Paper 3: Speaking

What’s assessed:

  • Individual research project
  • One of four sub themes: Aspects of society: current trends, current issues, artistic culture ,

    aspects of political life


How it’s assessed:

  • Oral exam: 21–23 minutes (including 5 minutes preparation time)
  • 60 marks in total
  • 30% of A-level. Discussion of a sub-theme with the discussion based on a stimulus card (5–6

    minutes). The student studies the card for 5 minutes at the start of the test (25 marks).

  • Presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9–10 minutes) of individual research project (35 marks).

No access to a dictionary during the assessment (including 5 minutes preparation).

Students may take the assessment only once before certification.

Assessments will be conducted by either the centre or a visiting examiner and marked by an AQA

examiner.

For further details please email caroline.piotrowski@mybiddenham.com


What are the entry requirements?

  • German GCSE at grade B or above.

It cannot be denied that there is quite a leap between GCSE and the AS level course, but no more in

Languages than with any of your subjects. A-level courses demand a greater level of self-motivation

and an ability to act on your own initiative; if you possess these qualities then we would welcome

you to the Languages Department to discuss your plans. We will be happy to show you the course

books and would encourage you to chat to students who are currently following the course.

A2 LEVEL
Successful completion of AS level. Pupils achieving Grade D or below at AS should contact the

Department to discuss the possibility of retaking AS units whilst following the A2 Course


What are the costs?

You are expected to have a good, sixth form-standard, bilingual dictionary and a grammar workbook

(the title of which you will be told at the start of the course).

It is anticipated that students will travel to the target language country either through trips

arranged by the Department or via the county run exchanges or work experience. Costs will vary

depending on the nature of the trip.

Day trips to language immersion conferences take place in Year 13. The cost of this is usually less

than £20, plus travel to London.

Is there anything else I need to know?

Please refer to entry requirements above.


Future opportunities

Statistics show that students of foreign languages have access to a greater number of career

possibilities and develop a deeper understanding of their own and other cultures. The benefits to

society are many: individuals fluent in other languages enhance our economic competitiveness

abroad, improve global communication, and, some would add, maintain our political and security

interests.

Universities offer not only degree courses in one or more languages. Some degrees integrate the

study of a language with other subjects such as European/ International Studies, Business Studies

or Leisure and Tourism. Other courses combine language study with another subject e.g. Marine

Sciences with French, Spanish and Computer Science. You may even take specialist language options

which relate directly to your main course of study e.g. French for lawyers, German for Engineers.


Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mrs C Piotrowski, caroline.piotrowski@biddenham.beds.sch.uk


GCE Government & Politics


What will I learn?

We are following the AQA specifications. There will be no changes until September 2017.

Consequently all Government and Politics students will be writing the AS examinations in Summer

2017.

At A/S there are two units; both are 1 hour 30 minute written examinations with two structured

source based questions from a choice of four.
Lessons are lively and debate is stimulated by regular visiting speakers including politicians and

university lecturers. We also visit Parliament in the early Spring.

UNIT 1 – PEOPLE, POLITICS AND PARTICIPATION
This unit focuses on the theme of political behaviour in the UK. It explores how people's different

patterns of participation can be explained and the forms of participation in a democracy. The

importance of voting behaviour, the influence of electoral systems in communicating political

opinion and the controversies surrounding the use of referendums are crucial topics for analysis.

The principal institutions through which people's participation is achieved: political parties and

pressure groups are explored in terms of communicating views, shaping people's political ideas and

the acquisition of resources which are likely to make them more powerful within the wider political

system.

UNIT 2 GOVERNING MODERN BRITAIN
This unit focuses on the process of governing the UK, with power dispersed from local to European

levels. The extent to which Britain's unique constitution regulates the process of government and

maintains the balance between individual rights and the power of the state is explored. The role of

Westminster in providing a democratic element in government is examined as well as the degree to

which power rests in the hands of unelected bureaucrats. The direction which government takes is

analysed at the very apex of power in arrangements within the core executive.

At A2 there are two more 1 hour 30 minute units; Unit 3A in January and Unit 4A in June. Both units

require answering two essay questions from a choice of four. This is an exciting course providing

the opportunity to compare the UK to our 'cousins across the pond'.

UNIT 3A - THE POLITICS OF THE USA
Topics include: The Electoral Process and Direct Democracy; Political Parties; Voting Behaviour;

Pressure Groups and Protest Movements.

UNIT 4A - THE GOVERNMENT OF THE USA
Topics include: The Constitutional Framework of US Government; The Legislative Branch of

Government: US Congress; The Executive Branch of Government and The Judicial Branch of Government:

The Supreme Court.

A2 offers many opportunities for individual study and research in order to focus and specialise on

topical issues. Student conferences will also be attended and there will be opportunities to meet

American politicians.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.


Is there anything else I need to know?

Ms Rose is very happy to discuss any of the details of the course, and your suitability for it,

with you. You can come and try a 'taster' lesson anytime too. Pop into H11 or email

helen.rose@mybiddenham.com


Future Opportunities?

The study Government and Politics enables students to develop a wide range of highly valued skills

including the ability to comprehend, synthesise and interpret information; analyse and evaluate

knowledge; identify connections, similarities and differences between the areas studied; select

relevant material and construct and communicate arguments clearly and coherently using appropriate

vocabulary. Politics A-Level students choose a wide range of degree courses including: Public

Policy, International Relations, Law, PPE, SPS and Management as well as Politics itself.

Who should I contact for additional information?

Course contact: Mr Alan Brown (Head of Sixth form) or follow us on Twitter @BISGovPolEcon


GCE Graphic Design


What will I learn?

Imaginative, creative and intuitive skills applied by the graphic designer along with aesthetic

understanding and critical judgement are developed through working with a broad range of media,

including traditional and new media technologies;

An understanding of the interrelationships between the design processes and the clients of graphic

design along with an awareness of the contexts in which they operate will be developed through

project based assignments. The different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of graphic

design practice will also be explored through a range of approaches to working with images, signs,

symbols and text. An understanding of pictorial space, composition, rhythm, scale and structure and

an understanding of formal elements, such as colour, tone, texture, shape and form will be

developed.


How will I be assessed?

AS Unit 1: Portfolio of Creative Skills *Unit code 6RM01/6GR01

Internally assessed

Availability: June

Content summary:
In this unit students are given the opportunity to develop their creative, technical and practical

skills through a series of product investigation, design and manufacturing activities.

Students will produce one portfolio with three distinct sections which will demonstrate their

creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making product(s). Ideally different

products should be chosen for the three distinct sections as students are not being asked to carry

out one large design and make exercise but three smaller and more focused tasks which build up to

provide a detailed portfolio of their skills.

Depending on the route students are studying, their products must comply with the requirements of

either a resistant materials technology product or a graphic product. This unit has been designed

to be as flexible as possible, offering students a wide range of valid approaches in producing

their portfolio of creative skills.

Students are encouraged to be as creative as possible and there are no barriers to choices of

product investigation, product design or product manufacture, as long as the work submitted by

students targets assessment criteria effectively and at the correct level of response for their

abilities.

Assessment:

This unit is internally set and marked by the centre and externally moderated by Edexcel.
The student will produce one portfolio that contains evidence for all three distinct sections. It

is important that all stages of the manufacturing process are photographed in order to evidence

that the product is complete, expertly made, well finished etc.

60% of the total AS mark

30% of the total GCE marks

AS Unit 2: Design and Technology in Practice

Unit code 6RM02/6GR02

Externally assessed

Availability: June

Content summary:
In this unit students will develop a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and

processes used in the field of design and technology.

It is important for students, as designers, to learn about materials and processes so that they can

develop a greater understanding of how products can be designed and manufactured.

Students will also learn about industrial and commercial practices, and the importance of quality

checks and the health and safety issues that have to be considered at all times.

The knowledge and understanding students develop in this unit can be easily applied to Unit 1:

Portfolio of Creative Skills.

Assessment:
1 hour 30 minute examination set and marked by Edexcel.

The paper will be a question and answer booklet, consisting of shortanswer and extendedwriting type

questions, all of which are compulsory

40% of the total AS mark

20% of the total GCE mark

A2 Unit 3: Designing for the Future *Unit code 6RM03/6GR03

Externally assessed

Availability: June

Content summary:

In this unit students will develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of modern design

and manufacturing practices and contemporary design issues. The modern designer must have a good

working knowledge of the use of ICT and systems and control technology in the design and

manufacture of products. They must also be aware of the important contributions of designers from

the past which may provide inspiration for future design. It is increasingly important that

students develop an awareness of the impact of design and technological activities on the

environment. Sustainable product design is a key feature of modern design practices.

Assessment:
2 hour examination paper set and marked by Edexcel.
The paper will be a question and answer booklet, consisting of short answer and extended writing

type questions, all of which are compulsory
40% of the total AS mark
20% of the total A2 mark
A2 Unit 4: Commercial Design *Unit code 6RM04/6GR04
Internally assessed
Availability: June

Content summary:
In this unit students are given the opportunity to apply the skills they have acquired and

developed throughout this course of study, to design and make a product of their choice that comply

with the requirements of either a resistant materials technology product or a graphic products,

depending on the route they are studying. In order to reach high attainment levels, students must

adopt a commercial design approach to their work, reflecting how a professional designer might deal

with a design problem and its resolution.

The choice of design problem should have a real commercial use, in that it should be useful to a

wider range of users beyond an individual, unless it has been specifically commissioned as a ‘one-

off’. The design problem should provide opportunities for a client or user-group to have input into

decision making at various stages of the design and make process.

A client or user-group is defined as any third party identified by a student, that is referred to

and who can give informed critical feedback at various stages throughout the design process.

Clients and user-groups do not need to be specialists or experts; they can be drawn from any

relevant group of people and may include other students, friends or family members.

A key feature of this unit is that students consider issues related to sustainability and the

impact their product may have on the environment. A student may choose to design and make a

sustainable product, but if they do not, they should still consider the issues of sustainability at

relevant points in their designing and making activities.

Sustainable issues include materials production and selection, manufacturing processes, use of the

product and its disposal/recycling.

Assessment:

This unit is internally set and marked by the centre and externally moderated by Edexcel.
Students are given the opportunity to design and make a produce of their choice. This unit results

in the development of an appropriate product supported by a design folder. It is important that all

stages of the manufacturing process are photographed in order to evidence that the product is

complete, expertly made, well finished etc


60% of the total A2 mark

30% of the total GCE mark


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at C or above.
  • Design Technology GCSE OR Art & Design GCSE at grade C or above.

Course contact: Mrs N Pearson, nicola.pearson@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board: Edexcel


Cambridge Technical Health and Social Care

Course Title

Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care


What will I learn?

Building positive relationships in health and social care, this unit aims to introduce you to the

many different relationships that you will encounter within the health and social care sector,

whether with colleagues, senior members of staff, other professionals within the sector and

individuals who require care and support. By doing this unit you will gain an understanding of how

context can impact on relationships and the many factors that influence the building of positive

relationships.

Equality diversity and rights on health and social care, this unit will help you to understand the

implications of diversity on practice and also the effects of discriminatory practice on

individuals who require care or support. You will also gain an appreciation of how legislation and

national initiatives can support and promote anti-discriminatory practice.

Health safety and security in health and social care, this unit introduces you to health, safety

and security in health and social care. You will acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to

equip you in maintaining a safe working environment for yourself, your colleagues and individuals

who require care and support. You will learn how legislation, policies and procedures work to

reduce risks in health and social care and the consequences of not following them. You will also

learn how to respond to different incidents and emergencies with health and social care settings.

Anatomy and physiology for health and social care, this unit aims to introduce you to the basic

structure and functions of the body systems involved in everyday activities and maintenance of

health, including cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive systems. You will also understand the

part played by organs such as the pancreas, liver and kidney. You will investigate the systems and

organs involved in detecting and responding to change such as the nervous system as well as the

eyes and ears.

Nutrition for health, this unit introduces nutritional health and the components of good nutrition.

You will have the opportunity to scrutinise different foods, consider their health benefits and

investigate how to support other people to impact their health and well-being.

Psychology for health and social care (unit is still being developed)


How will I be assessed?

Unit 1 - Building positive relationships in health and social care - internally assessed

Unit 2 - Equality, diversity and rights in health and social care - externally assessed

Unit 3 - Health, safety and security in health and social care - externally assessed

Unit 4 - Physiology and anatomy for health - externally assessed

Unit 10 - Nutrition for health - internally assessed

Unit 22 - Psychology for health and social care - internally assessed


What are the entry requirements?

Level 3 Academic / Technical Course entry requirements.

It would be recommended to have a C in GCSE science(s) but this is not an entry requirement


Future Opportunities

Careers in

Childcare

Nursing

Paediatrics

Midwifery

Social work

Teaching/similar careers

Police Officer

Probation Officer/YOT

Medicine

Paramedics

Health visitor

Mental health

Counselling

Course contact: Mrs A Speight, abigail.speight@biddenham.beds.sch.uk
Examination Board : OCR http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-education-and-

skills/cambridge-technicals-health-and-social-care-level-3-certificate-extended-certificate-

foundation-diploma-diploma-05830-05833-2016-suite/


GCE History


Why study History at A Level?

Wherever you will go in the future, whether it is to university or an apprenticeship or into the

world of work people will know and value your education when you tell them you have done A Level

History. This is because History is a challenging and exciting discipline that develops not only

your deeper understanding of the present by exploring the past but it also enhances your analytical

and evaluative skills and teaches you how to gather together all of your knowledge and

understanding and formulate your own supported argument.

In the past students of History have gone on to study a variety of subjects at university including

politics, law, education, international relations, anthropology, archaeology, sociology,

criminology, literature and business as well as ancient, medieval and modern history. History

graduates have had success in fields like politics, entertainment, media, writing and law.

An A Level in History shows that you have a wide range of higher-order thinking skills such as the

ability to research independently and build a strong argument. These are transferable skills that

can be applied to any future discipline or employment. However, more than anything, History is a

fascinating voyage into a past filled with colourful characters, stories, inventions, adventures,

comedies and tragedies, all of which have shaped who we are today.


What will you study?

Here at Biddenham we do Edexcel A Level History. There are four units in A Level history, three

exam units and one independently researched coursework unit. The units are split across two years

and cover a mixture of historical periods from the 18th century onwards. All of your lessons are

taught by history specialists who have expertise in the areas covered by the specification.

Yr 12
Britain Transformed, 1918-97
Starting in September of Y12 you will be studying the first half of your linked units on

democracies in change. In the 20th century liberal democracies came under increasing challenge from

both within and without. Through learning about Britain, you will be able to understand the nature

and effectiveness of the response to these challenges. The unit focuses on the social, political

and economic impacts of these and covers everything from the impact and the end of WWI to the rise

and fall of Margaret Thatcher and her legacy.

Ireland and the Union, c1774-1923
The second unit studied in Y12, this comprises two parts: the breadth focus on long-term changes in

Ireland’s relationship with the United Kingdom and the more in-depth focus on key episodes of

history during this period. The unit focuses on the political and social impact of the changes from

the start of rebellion in the late 18th century through to the end of the Irish Civil War.

Yr 13
The USA, 195-1992: Conformity and Challenge
The second of the two democracies in change units, this one consists of a depth study of the USA in

the post-WWII period, focusing on the growing affluence of white suburbia in the 1950s through the

racial and political protests of the 1960s to the rise of right-wing groups in the 1980s and the

development of bitter divisions between Democrats and Republicans. This unit, like the one on

Britain, focuses on social, political and economic changes and challenges.

Interpretations of the Past Through Coursework
The coursework unit will link to the work done on Ireland in Y12, this ensures that you will have a

very solid foundation upon which to build your independently researched historical enquiry. As you

delve deeper into Anglo-Irish history you will be able to see how historians have formulates their

arguments and use that historiographical understanding to structure your own.


Why did we choose these topics?

The topics that were chosen play to the strengths and interests of the teachers who will be helping

you through your History A Level, but more than that they ensure that you are taught topics that

will be of interest to you and are easy to engage with. The sense of slight familiarity with the

periods covered will help you because it means you will start with a preconception about the period

and the people who lived then, be it good or bad; most of us will know of Martin Luther King Jr,

John F. Kennedy, Margaret Thatcher and the NHS.


How will you be assessed?

The History specification has recently undergone several changes to meet the new government

guidelines. As a result the assessment schedule has changed significantly. Paper 1, 2 and 3 are

exam units and will be assessed at the end of Y13. The coursework unit will be completed part-way

through Y13 but will be typed and include a bibliography.

Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3 Coursework
1H Britain Transformed, 1918-97 2H.2 The USA, 1955-92: conformity and challenge H6 36.2 Ireland and the Union, c1774-1923 04 Coursework on Anglo-Irish History
Worth 30% of A Level Worth 20% of A Level Worth 30% of A Level Worth 20% of A Level


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above and if History GCSE was taken then a grade C or above.
  • An interest in and enjoyment of history.
  • A desire to challenge yourself to develop skills of analysis, research, evaluation and

    argument.

  • A desire to take part in class discussion and independent projects.
  • An acceptance of the high level of reading required.
  • The ability to work independently and do independent study each week.


What are the costs?

You will be expected to purchase the textbooks for the unit and use these to help you with your

study. There are three textbooks, one covers both Paper 1 and Paper 2 and the other two covers

Paper 3 and contributes towards your Coursework. As of November 2016 the books were priced at:

£24.99 (available for purchase now) £16.99 (available for purchase now) £7.99 (on average; available now for purchase)

There are also trips planned for A Level history, students are responsible for paying for any trip

fees. You will need to provide your own stationery for use in lessons (i.e. pen and paper).


Is there anything else I need to know?

History is a challenging subject and will require considerable reading and plenty of writing. The

pay-off is that in addition to learning a lot about the world and its history, a History A Level is

held in very high regard by university admissions tutors and employers.

If you have any further questions you can contact the Head of History, Mrs Vaughan via e-mail at:

reeann.vaughan@mybiddenham.com or Tweet us at: @BISHistoryDep


GCE Law


What Will I learn?

Law aims to provide grounding in the main principles and development of English Law; a knowledge

and understanding of the structure, personnel and functions of the English Legal System, the

Criminal Law and a critical awareness of the changing nature of Law in society. It is advisable for

anyone who is considering a career in law, to study law so that they can make an informed choice

about their career.


What Are The Entry Requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.
  • OR

  • Law GCSE at grade C or above.
  • OR

  • History GCSE at grade C or above.


How Will I Be Assessed?

Assessment is based on two external examinations for the AS and a further two for the A2. There is

no coursework and examinations are sat in May (AS) and June (A2).


What Are The Costs?

Students will be expected to purchase an up to date textbook and revision guides. In addition, we

may visit the local and central London law courts, the Houses of Parliament and attend conferences

organised by the exam board.


Is There Anything Else I need to Know?

The Law course is designed to give you a clear view of the English Legal System (AS) and Criminal

Law (A2). You will be given class notes, your teacher will deliver the main aspects of each topic,

and you will be expected to undertake individual and group work based on the teacher’s delivery.

This may involve carrying out more detailed research.

There will be a variety of methods to deliver the subject. There will be lectures, question and

answer sessions, individual task work, group work, discussions, role-play, student presentations,

timed exam questions and mock exams. Much of the information will be reproduced in diagrammatic

form to make learning easier. You will be expected to make your own comprehensive revision notes,

you will have to read a lot to reinforce your knowledge and understanding, apply the law to

problems and issues; carry out independent research, willingly contribute to class discussions and

activities and be committed to hard work.


Future opportunities?

A large majority of our students go onto to study Law at university. The study of Law at A level

allows students to make an informed choice about whether a career in the law is the right option

for them. Those students who go onto to study other subjects at university have through the study

of law developed essential skills to equip them for higher education.
Law graduates go on to train as solicitors or barristers or alternatively find employment in most

areas – legal, local government, public sector, administration, business, personnel, banking,

retail, tourism, etc.


Comments Written By Law Students

“Law is an interesting subject to do, and even if you are not considering a job in law when you’re

older, it can help you in everyday life, such as your rights”
“Law is a challenging subject, it has opened my eyes to the laws that govern the land and the

courts and the running of the whole country. The most challenging part of the subject is trying to

remember cases that give examples of the law in action. The lessons are always interactive and

light-hearted. I think it is an excellent subject to start with afresh.”

“In my first year I perceived law as a difficult subject with too many concepts to focus on.

However, as the course progressed I developed a liking for it. It is indeed an interesting

discipline and affects our lives without us realising. If you are a person who likes to prove a

point, win an argument and feel strongly about certain issues then law would be a wise choice for

you. I now enjoy law so much I have decided to study law at university.”


Further Information

Course contact: Mrs K Saggu, kuldip.saggu@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam board information: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/law/a-level/law-2160


GCE Mathematics

A level mathematics provides a framework within which a large number of young people continue the

subject beyond GCSE level. It supports their mathematical needs across a broad range of other

subjects at this level and provides a basis for subsequent quantitative work in a very wide range

of higher education courses and in employment. It also supports the study of AS and A level further

mathematics.
A level mathematics builds from GCSE level mathematics and introduces calculus and its

applications. It emphasises how mathematical ideas are interconnected and how mathematics can be

applied to model situations mathematically using algebra and other representations, to help make

sense of data, to understand the physical world and to solve problems in a variety of contexts,

including social sciences and business. It prepares students for further study and employment in a

wide range of disciplines involving the use of mathematics.

AS mathematics, which can be co-taught with the A level as a separate qualification, is a very

useful qualification in its own right. It consolidates and develops GCSE level mathematics and

supports transition to higher education or employment in any of the many disciplines that make use

of quantitative analysis, including those involving calculus.


What will I learn?

What will I learn and how will I be assessed?

Picture here


What are the entry requirements?

  • Maths GCSE at grade 7 or above.


What are the costs?

A scientific calculator will be essential for this course.


Future opportunities?

It has been shown that students with a good grade at A2 Mathematics earn on average £15,000 per

annum more than those without. It is a prerequisite for entry to university courses to study

finance or medicine.

Course contact: Mr P Strzelec, piotr.strzelec@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Edexcel website: http://www.edexcel.com/Pages/Home.aspx


GCE Further Mathematics

This course is designed for students who are very interested in Mathematics and want to be able to

think through higher level problems and learn about new topics including complex numbers and polar

coordinates.


What will I learn and how will I be assessed?

For AS Level, one of the three modules studied at this level has to be Further Pure Maths 1 but the

other two modules can be any of the application modules not already studied at AS or A2 Level

Mathematics.

Picture here


What are the entry requirements?

Maths GCSE at grade 8 or above.


What are the costs?

It is expected that each student will own a scientific calculator. It could also be useful to

individual students to have a revision guide for each module taken.


Future Opportunities.

There is research to suggest that someone who has Mathematics A Level earns more than £15,000 more

per year than someone who does not.

An AS/A2 Level in Further Mathematics is an entry requirement for some university courses. It is

beneficial to have studied to this level for some careers especially those of a heavy mathematical

nature including engineering and aeronautics.

Course contact: Mr P Strzelec, piotr.strzelec@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Edexcel website: http://www.edexcel.com/Pages/Home.aspx


GCE Media Studies


What will I learn?

Studying this subject will mean you study a comprehensive range of media theory and practice.

There is a strong focus on new technologies and you will look at the audience as both consumers and

producers of media texts.

As a candidate you will learn the basics of deconstructing Media Forms by looking into Media

Representations, Institutions, Audiences, News Values, Moral panics, Semiotics, Structuralism and

post-structuralism, Postmodernism and its critiques, Gender and Ethnicity, Marxism and Hegemony,

Liberal Pluralism, Colonialism and Post-colonialism, Audience Theories, Genre Theories.

The Media Platforms studied include Broadcasting, Digital/web-based media (e-media) and Print

Media. There is also the opportunity to learn how to capture moving images effectively and use up

to date editing software to compile it all into an original piece.


How will I be assessed?

At AS (year 12) you will study two units;


Written Assessment 1 :

Questions will focus on issues and debates in the media. A topic will be released

in advance of the exam. Students will be expected to use any relevant elements of the theoretical

framework in order to explore the ideas in the paper. 2 hours. 35% of A Level.


Written Assessment 2 :

Questions will focus on the analysis of media products, through the lens of the

theoretical framework. Students will be expected to refer to the Close Study Products (CSPs)

provided by AQA and other products they have studied. They will also be expected to demonstrate

understanding of the contexts in which the products were created. 2 hours. 35% of A Level.


Non-Written Assessment - Creating a Media Product :

Application of knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework. Practical

skills relating to the media format of their choice. 30% of A Level.

The assessments in both AS and A2 surround a coursework module which allows the student to be

creative. This can include filming, still camera work, radio presenting and website creation. There

is also an exam in AS and A2 which surrounds the themes and ideas which would have been discussed

during the year based upon specific examples of media texts.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade 5 or above.


Future opportunities?

The opportunities which are available for those students who study Media can lead to Higher

education; Newspaper design; Magazine design; Journalism; Television production; Radio production;

Marketing; Editing; 'New media' jobs; e-media; Development; Teaching and Lecturing as well as many

other vocations.

Course contact: Mr A Smith, ali.smith@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: AQA


GCE Music


What will I learn?

Studying this subject will mean you study a comprehensive range of media theory and practice.

There is a strong focus on new technologies and you will look at the audience as both consumers and

producers of media texts. There are opportunities for you to investigate an area of the media that

interests you, as well as having the opportunity to carry out practical production at both AS and

A2.

As a candidate you will learn the basics of deconstructing Media Forms by looking into Media

Representations, Institutions, Audiences, News Values, Moral panics, Semiotics, Structuralism and

post-structuralism, Postmodernism and its critiques, Gender and Ethnicity, Marxism and Hegemony,

Liberal Pluralism, Colonialism and Post-colonialism, Audience Theories, Genre Theories.

The Media Platforms studied include Broadcasting, Digital/web-based media (e-media) and Print

Media. There is also the opportunity to learn how to capture moving images effectively and use up

to date editing software to compile it all into an original piece.


How will I be assessed?

At AS (year 12) you will study two units;

Unit 1:

‘Investigating Media’ concludes with a two hour written examination,

consisting of four compulsory short answer questions and a choice of essay topic.


Unit 2:

‘Creating Media’, this is a practical unit where you produce two linked

production pieces taken from two of the three media platforms studied in unit 1, followed by a 1500

word evaluation.

At A2 (year 13) you will study two further units;


Unit 3:

‘Critical Perspective’ which concluded in a two hour written examination,

consisting of three
compulsory questions on an unseen stimulus (piece of media) and a choice of essay topic.


Unit 4:

‘Research and Production’, this is a practical unit where you complete a

critical investigation and a linked production piece.

The assessments in both AS and A2 surround a coursework module which allows the student to be

creative. This can include filming, still camera work, radio presenting and website creation. There

is also an exam in AS and A2 which surrounds the themes and ideas which would have been discussed

during the year based upon specific examples of media texts.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.


Future opportunities?

The opportunities which are available for those students who study Media can lead to Higher

education; Newspaper design; Magazine design; Journalism; Television production; Radio production;

Marketing; Editing; 'New media' jobs; e-media; Development; Teaching and Lecturing as well as many

other vocations.

Course contact: Miss G Murphy, georgina.murphy@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: AQA


GCE Physics


What will I learn?

OCR’s Physics B specification has been designed so students study physics within the distinctive

‘Advancing Physics’ context-based approach.

The Alevel specification is split into six modules:

  • Module 1 – Development of practical skills in physics
  • 1.1 Practical skills assessed in a written examination

    1.2 Practical skills assessed in the practical endorsement

  • Module 2 – Fundamental data analysis
  • Module 3 – Physics in action
  • 3.1.1 Imaging and signalling

    3.1.2 Sensing

    3.2 Mechanical properties of materials

  • Module 4 – Understanding processes
  • 4.1 Waves and quantum behaviour

    4.2 Space, time and motion

  • Module 5 – Rise and fall of the clockwork universe
  • 5.1.1 Creating models

    5.1.2 Out into space

    5.1.3 Our place in the universe

    5.2.1 Matter: very simple

    5.2.2 Matter: hot or cold

  • Module 6 – Field and particle physics
  • 6.1.1 Electromagnetism

    6.1.2 Charge and field

    6.2.1 Probing deep into matter

    6.2.2 Ionising radiation and risk.

For more information please visit:


http://www.advancingphysics.org/

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-physics-b-advancing-...

2015/


How will I be assessed?

Paper 1 assesses content from Modules 1, 2, 3 and 5.

Paper 2 assesses content from Modules 1, 2, 4 and 6.

Paper 3 assesses content from Modules 1 to 6.

Practical endorsement.

Paper 1: Modelling physics is a 135 minute paper; is worth 37% and comprises two sections. Section

A is a 15 mark multiple choice paper and Section B is an 85 mark paper composed of structured

questions.

Paper 2: Exploring physics is a 135 minute paper; is worth 37% and comprises two sections. Section

A is a 15 mark multiple choice paper and Section B is an 85 mark paper composed of structured

questions.

Paper 3: Unified physics is a 90 minute paper; is worth 26% and is a single 70 mark paper.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.
  • Maths GCSE at grade B or above.
  • Additional Science GCSE or Physics GCSE at grade B or above.
  • For students who have taken BTEC level 2 courses, a DISTINCTION is required as well as a grade B in

    English and Maths.


What are the costs?

A textbook at AS (and a further textbook at A2), which are used continuously throughout the course.

Approximate cost: £20-25 per book. In addition a suitable scientific calculator. It is expected

that most students will have one from studying GCSE Maths and Science, however if one is not

available we recommend purchasing one in the Casio fx83 or Casio fx85 range, usually costing around

£8-12.


Is there anything else I need to know?

Most of the work is structured into study packs that will be available through Google Docs.

Extensive use is made of ICT including the internet, PowerPoint, video clips, spread sheeting,

flash animations and java applets.

Other subjects that would go well with Physics GCE are Advanced level Biology, Mathematics and

Chemistry. However, other combinations of subjects including Economics, Geology or Geography are

also suitable. Students who are concentrating on Arts, Humanities or Modern Language subjects may

wish to take Physics to broaden their studies by continuing to take a Science subject.


The demands of the course

Year 12 and 13 is a halfway house between school and university. Students will be responsible for

their own learning. Teachers are there to help students learn how to learn. It is intended that

Year 12 will be a continuation of GCSE Physics although new mathematical methods are introduced at

this level, and students should be prepared to use extensive mathematics to solve a variety of

physics problems. Year 13 can be more demanding.

Almost all students find the Physics course a challenge. Due to the rigorous nature of the course,

homework is set and checked regularly.


Future opportunities?

With a qualification in Physics you could go to University to study Physics or Engineering. Physics

is highly regarded and is also an extremely important part of many careers, including architecture

and construction. Because Physics is a numerate and scientific discipline it is also regarded as a

badge for many disciplines, giving preferred entry into a variety of fields such as finance,

management and medicine. Physics is a shortage subject, meaning that students with these

qualifications are generally in demand.

Course contact: Mr A Parish, antony.parish@biddenham.beds.sch.uk


GCE Psychology

Psychology is the study of mental processes and human and animal behaviour.


What will I learn?

Psychology is the science of the mind and behaviour and so the course focuses research through

scientific principles. You will learn about seminal and contemporary approaches to Psychology

including Behaviourism and Positive Psychology before looking at themes in Psychology which

includes criminal behaviour, stress and schizophrenia. Alongside these units you will learn the

principles of Psychological research, conduct your own research and practice statistical techniques

to analyse your findings.


How will I be assessed?

The A level course is entirely exam based and there will be exams at the end of year 2.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English, Maths and Science/Psychology GCSE at grade C or above.
  • For students who have taken Science BTEC level 2 courses, a DISTINCTION is required.


What are the costs?

There are minimal extra costs involved in this course. However there is also the opportunity to

purchase the course textbook.


Is there anything else I need to know?

Student Comments:

"Lots of work, lots to learn and memorise, but very interesting."

"Psychology is a challenging subject, but equally rewarding. It wasn't what we expected but it

broadens our knowledge and we are having fun along the way."


Future opportunities?

A level Psychology is an excellent introduction to a career in Psychology, including counselling,

sports, educational or forensic. Psychology bridges between the arts and science based subjects

combining well with subjects such as Sociology, Biology, Communication Studies and Law. A highly

regarded subject, A Level Psychology can lead students to university or employment.

For further information please contact: Mrs E Latchman, emma.latchman@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: Eduqas


GCE Religious Studies


What will I learn?

AS and A-level Religious Studies helps to students develop their understanding of religion and

belief including religious, philosophical and/or ethical thought and teachings. It also helps

students to understand the influence of beliefs, teachings and practices on individuals,

communities and societies. Students will also analyse the cause and significance of similarities

and differences in belief, teaching and practice and the different approaches to the study of

religion and belief. Students will be encouraged to deal with controversial ideas about beliefs

and values and to have the confidence in their ability to express their own beliefs and values

supported by reasoned argument and evidence. They will focus on exploring common ground and

controversy in dealing with issues that arise in morality and religion and on using the writings of

key scholars to explore differing viewpoints about the development of ideas.


Year 1 Religious Studies

Students will study three different topics:


1. Religion and Ethics


Significant concepts in issues or debates in religion and ethics; A study of three ethical

theories; Application of ethical theories to issues of importance.


2. New Testament Studies


Social, historical and religious context of the New Testament; Texts and interpretation of the

Person of Jesus; Interpreting the text and issues of relationship, purpose and authorship.


3. Study of Religion (Islam)


Religious beliefs, values and teachings; Sources of wisdom and authority; Practices that shape and

express religious identity.


Year 2 Religious Studies


1. Religion and Ethics

Ethical language; Deontology, Virtue Ethics and the works of scholars; Medical ethics: beginning

and end of life issues.


2. New Testament Studies

Ways of interpreting the scripture; Texts and interpretation: the Kingdom of God, conflict, the

death and resurrection of Jesus; Scientific and historical critical challenges, ethical living and

the works of scholars.


3. Study of Religion (Islam)

Social and historical developments; Works of scholars; Religion and society; Primary texts.


What Are the Entry Requirements?


    GCSE, Religious Studies Grade C or above.


How will I be assessed?

A Level: Each topic will be assessed by a two hour written examination worth 80 marks each. The

paper will consist of three short, structured questions, two extended response questions on an

unseen passage and a choice of two extended essay questions.


Future opportunities:

Religious Studies is a highly regarded A level qualification and is on the list of subjects

approved by Russell Group Universities. Students who study Religious Studies at A level go on to

study a wide range of subjects


Who should I contact for extra information?

Course contact: Mr P Forster, paul.forster@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Exam Board: Edexcel


GCE Sociology


What will I learn?

Sociology, essentially, is the study of society. We talk about how society works and who are the

different groups are that make up our society. During the two year course students study:

  • Family and Households
  • Education
  • Beliefs in Society
  • Crime and Deviance
  • Theory and Methods

The questions that we will consider in the first term are:

  • Why do we go to school?
  • How have family types changed in the UK?
  • How does the government influence our education?


How will I be assessed?

The A level course is entirely exam based and there will be an internal exam at the end of year 1

and and external exam for all units at the end of year 2.


What are the entry requirements?

  • English GCSE at grade C or above.
  • Level 3 Academic Course entry requirements.


What are the costs?

There are minimal extra costs involved in this course. However we visit a local museum during the

Beliefs in Society unit and there is also the opportunity to purchase additional textbooks and

journals.


Future opportunities?

Students with Sociology A-Level are accepted onto a range of university degrees courses, from

Nursing and Social Work to Journalism and Social Sciences. One of our past students is currently

doing an Architecture degree at Manchester University! Sociology is a good course for progression

into Public Services like the Police as the study of Crime & Deviance, for example, fosters a good

understanding of the workings of wider society.

For further information please contact: Mrs Deena Gill - Deena.gill@biddenham.beds.sch.uk

Examination board: AQA

Useful information regarding the course can be viewed on the AQA website:
http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/sociology/AQA-7191-7192-WHY-CHOOSE...


GCE Spanish


What will I learn?

The course aims to develop an understanding of up to date language and contemporary issues from

authentic sources, such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, songs and the Internet. The

target language is used most of the time, in the classroom and in conversation with an Assistant.

‘Taking part’ is vital for success. Students are encouraged to visit a country where the language

is spoken and to take part in the county sixth form exchange programme. In addition, A level

linguists are encouraged to apply for the county work experience scheme, whereby you can spend 2

weeks working in a Spanish firm. In previous years, Biddenham students have worked in offices,

factories and banks gaining tremendous experience and giving themselves a most interesting CV.

Subject content:

  • Social issues and trends
  • Political and artistic culture
  • Grammar

Option:

  • Works: Literary text and film



Assessments:


Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing

What’s assessed:

  • Aspects of target language speaking society: current trends
  • Aspects of target language-speaking society: current issues
  • Artistic culture in the target language -speaking world
  • Aspects of political life in the target language-speaking world
  • Grammar

How it’s assessed: Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

  • 100 marks
  • 50% of A-leve

Paper 2 writing

  • One text and one film or two texts from the list set in the specification
  • Grammar

How it's assessed: Written exam: 2 hours, 80 marks in total, 20 % of A Level


Paper 3: Speaking


What’s assessed:


  • Individual research project
  • One of four sub themes: Aspects of society: current trends, current issues, artistic culture ,

    aspects of political life.

How it’s assessed:


  • Oral exam: 21–23 minutes (including 5 minutes preparation time)
  • 60 marks in total
  • 30% of A-level. Discussion of a sub-theme with the discussion based on a stimulus card (5–6

    minutes). The student studies the card for 5 minutes at the start of the test (25 marks).

  • Presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9–10 minutes) of individual research project (35 marks).



No access to a dictionary during the assessment (including 5 minutes preparation).


Students may take the assessment only once before certification.


Assessments will be conducted by either the centre or a visiting examiner and marked by an AQA

examiner.


For further details please email caroline.piotrowski@mybiddenham.com


What are the entry requirements?

  • Spanish GCSE at grade B or above.

It cannot be denied that there is quite a leap between the GCSE and the AS Level course, but no

more in Languages than with any of your subjects. A Level courses demand a greater level of self-

motivation and an ability to act on your own initiative; if you possess these qualities then we

would welcome you to the Languages Department to discuss your plans. We will be happy to show you

the course books and would encourage you to chat to students who are currently following the

course.


A 2 LEVEL

Successful completion of AS Level. Pupils achieving Grade D or below at AS should contact the

Department to discuss the possibility of retaking AS units whilst following the A2 course.


What are the costs?

You are expected to have a good, sixth form-standard, bilingual dictionary and a grammar workbook

(the title of which you will be told at the start of the course).

It is anticipated that students will travel to the target language country either through trips

arranged by the Department or via the county run exchanges or work experience. Costs will vary

depending on the nature of the trip.

Day trips to language immersion conferences take place in Year 13. This cost of this is usually

less than £20 plus travel into London.


Is there anything else I need to know?

Please refer to entry requirements above.


Future opportunities?

Statistics show that students of foreign languages have access to a greater number of career

possibilities and develop a deeper understanding of their own and other cultures. The benefits to

society are many: individuals fluent in other languages enhance our economic competitiveness

abroad, improve global communication, and, some would add, maintain our political and security

interests.

Universities offer not only degree courses in one or more languages. Some degrees integrate the

study of a language with other subjects such as European/International Studies, Business Studies or

Leisure and Tourism. Other courses combine language study with another subject e.g. Marine

Sciences with French, Spanish and Computer Science. You may even take specialist language options

which relate directly to your main course of study e.g. French for lawyers, German for Engineers.

Course contact: Mrs C Piotrowski, caroline.piotrowski@biddenham.beds.sch.uk